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I have this text file "test.txt" that I want to read. It has a few lines:

line1
line2
trim(1255, 158597)
#712, 272, 4, 102

I am using the following code:

itrimcmd = ""
secondline = ""    
File.open("test.txt").each_line { |line|
  puts "[8]...  #{line}"
  if line =~ /^trim/ then itrimcmd = line end
  if line =~ /^#/  then secondline = line end
}
puts "itrimcmd:  #{itrimcmd}"
puts "secondline:  #{secondline}"

My code doesn't work with this file. Output:

#712, 272, 4, 102)
itrimcmd:
secondline:

If I retype a second file, with the exact same content, this time, I get the correct result:

line1
line2
trim(1255, 158597)
#712, 272, 4, 102

I don't see any difference between the two text files. Correct output:

[2]...  line1
[2]...  line2
[2]...  trim(1255, 158597)
[2]...  #712, 272, 4, 102
itrimcmd:  trim(1255, 158597)
secondline:  #712, 272, 4, 102

I am using Ruby 1.9.3 on Windows 7.

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2  
The only thing I can think now is that the two versions of the file test.txt may have different newlines. There are three types of newlines: \n (linux), \r\n (windows) and \r (mac). Try to open the file in binary mode and/or in text mode and maybe you can get the expected result. –  Sony Santos May 29 '13 at 0:01
    
That was correct. The first file (that didn't work as expected) had only CR (\r) as end of line, instead of CRLF (\r\n). Now I need to figure out why Notepad++ is not consistent on that question, and how I can force it to always use \r\n. –  jen May 29 '13 at 2:17
    
@SonySantos Make it an answer! –  Andrew Marshall May 29 '13 at 2:33
    
@jen If the answer is good enough for you, please "choose it" by clicking on the check mark . :) –  Sony Santos Jun 17 '13 at 18:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The only thing I can think now is that the two versions of the file test.txt may have different newlines. There are three types of newlines: \n (linux), \r\n (windows) and \r (mac). Try to open the file in binary mode and/or in text mode and maybe you can get the expected result.

About the CRLF configuration of Notepad++ on your comment, you can go into menu Settings -> Preferences -> New document/Default Directory -> New Document -> Format -> Windows. (That's the path on version 5.8.6).

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