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I have an array of hashes which looks like this:

[
  {:name=>"CCC_010112.JPG", :type=>"CCC", :date=>"120101"},
  {:name=>"BBB_050112.JPG", :type=>"BBB", :date=>"120501"},
  {:name=>"BBB_040112.JPG", :type=>"BBB", :date=>"120401"},
  {:name=>"BBB_030112.JPG", :type=>"BBB", :date=>"120301"},
  {:name=>"BBB_020112.JPG", :type=>"BBB", :date=>"120201"},
  {:name=>"BBB_010112.JPG", :type=>"BBB", :date=>"120101"},
  {:name=>"AAA_040112.JPG", :type=>"AAA", :date=>"120401"},
  {:name=>"AAA_030112.JPG", :type=>"AAA", :date=>"120301"},
  {:name=>"AAA_020112.JPG", :type=>"AAA", :date=>"120201"},
]

I am trying to capture the first three of each type. (e.g., my results should yield the array bove, only cutting out the bottom two of the "BBB" elements. I tried variants of the following:

puts a.each{|e| e[:type]}.take(3) #Shows top 3 of all
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What do you mean by "top 3"? First 3 that happen to come up? Or do the elements have some ordering property you haven't told us about? –  pjs May 29 '13 at 0:01
    
What does "top" mean? Can you use group_by to separate the... uh... groups? –  Dave Newton May 29 '13 at 0:01
    
@DaveNewton I'm not familiar with group_by, but will look into it –  Hamptonite May 29 '13 at 0:09
    
@pjs - the list is already reverse-sorted. I need the first 3 that come up –  Hamptonite May 29 '13 at 0:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There's probably a more efficient way, but off the top:

a = [
{:name=>"CCC_010112.JPG", :type=>"CCC", :date=>"120101"},
{:name=>"BBB_050112.JPG", :type=>"BBB", :date=>"120501"},
{:name=>"BBB_040112.JPG", :type=>"BBB", :date=>"120401"},
{:name=>"BBB_030112.JPG", :type=>"BBB", :date=>"120301"},
{:name=>"BBB_020112.JPG", :type=>"BBB", :date=>"120201"},
{:name=>"BBB_010112.JPG", :type=>"BBB", :date=>"120101"},
{:name=>"AAA_040112.JPG", :type=>"AAA", :date=>"120401"},
{:name=>"AAA_030112.JPG", :type=>"AAA", :date=>"120301"},
{:name=>"AAA_020112.JPG", :type=>"AAA", :date=>"120201"}
]

a_types = (a.collect { |e| e[:type] }).uniq
a_top3 = []
a_types.each { |t| a_top3 << (a.select { |e| e[:type] == t }).take(3) }
a_top3.flatten!
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The first is only returning 3 elements, but I need the first 3 of each element type. –  Hamptonite May 29 '13 at 0:06
1  
actually.. that worked perfectly.. but I need the array, not the puts –  Hamptonite May 29 '13 at 0:18
    
I changed it to create an array. –  lurker May 29 '13 at 3:04

I would do using Enumerable#chunk, as in the array all different types like 'CCC', 'BBB' etc are already clubbed together. If they were scattered, group_by, to club different types of hashes first.

a = [
       {:name=>"CCC_010112.JPG", :type=>"CCC", :date=>"120101"},
       {:name=>"BBB_050112.JPG", :type=>"BBB", :date=>"120501"},
       {:name=>"BBB_040112.JPG", :type=>"BBB", :date=>"120401"},
       {:name=>"BBB_030112.JPG", :type=>"BBB", :date=>"120301"},
       {:name=>"BBB_020112.JPG", :type=>"BBB", :date=>"120201"},
       {:name=>"BBB_010112.JPG", :type=>"BBB", :date=>"120101"},
       {:name=>"AAA_040112.JPG", :type=>"AAA", :date=>"120401"},
       {:name=>"AAA_030112.JPG", :type=>"AAA", :date=>"120301"},
       {:name=>"AAA_020112.JPG", :type=>"AAA", :date=>"120201"}
    ]

final_top3_ary = a.chunk { |hash| hash[:type] }.flat_map { |_,ary| ary.take(3) }

final_top3_ary
# => [{:name=>"CCC_010112.JPG", :type=>"CCC", :date=>"120101"},
#     {:name=>"BBB_050112.JPG", :type=>"BBB", :date=>"120501"},
#     {:name=>"BBB_040112.JPG", :type=>"BBB", :date=>"120401"},
#     {:name=>"BBB_030112.JPG", :type=>"BBB", :date=>"120301"},
#     {:name=>"AAA_040112.JPG", :type=>"AAA", :date=>"120401"},
#     {:name=>"AAA_030112.JPG", :type=>"AAA", :date=>"120301"},
#     {:name=>"AAA_020112.JPG", :type=>"AAA", :date=>"120201"}]
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1  
This would look a lot nicer if you used braces for the block passed to chunk to create a one-liner (in my opinion). +1 anyway :) –  Mark Thomas Mar 14 at 0:28
    
@MarkThomas Yes.. Indeed :-) –  Arup Rakshit Mar 14 at 7:26
1  
Very nice, @Arup +1. You mentioned the use of group_by, but you might be more specific: one need only change chunk to group_by in your expression. Alternatively, one could first a.sort_by {|h} h[:type]}, which has the possible side benefit of ordering the elements of the output array alphabeticaly by :type. –  Cary Swoveland Mar 14 at 16:56
    
@CarySwoveland You mentioned it more nicer than I could be. I hope future readers would take the hints from the comment itself. Thank you very much! –  Arup Rakshit Mar 14 at 17:29

Since you mentioned in comments that your list is already reverse-sorted, we can use just this:

top3_of_each = a.inject([]) do |acc, h|
  acc << h if acc.length < 3 || h[:type] != acc[acc.length-3][:type]
  acc
end

If the list is not reverse-sorted, then we need to do more work on grouping hashes by types and finding top 3 for each type.

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