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I've got a WCF DataContract that looks like the following:

namespace MyCompanyName.Services.Wcf
{
  [DataContract(Namespace = "http://mycompanyname/services/wcf")]
  [Serializable]
  public class DataContractBase
  {
    [DataMember]
    public DateTime EditDate { get; set; }

    // code omitted for brevity...
  }
}

When I add a reference to this service in Visual Studio, this proxy code is generated:

/// <remarks/>
[System.CodeDom.Compiler.GeneratedCodeAttribute("System.Xml", "2.0.50727.3082")]
[System.SerializableAttribute()]
[System.Diagnostics.DebuggerStepThroughAttribute()]
[System.ComponentModel.DesignerCategoryAttribute("code")]
[System.Xml.Serialization.XmlTypeAttribute(Namespace="http://mycompanyname/services/wcf")]
public partial class DataContractBase : object, System.ComponentModel.INotifyPropertyChanged {

    private System.DateTime editDateField;

    private bool editDateFieldSpecified;

    /// <remarks/>
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElementAttribute(Order=0)]
    public System.DateTime EditDate {
        get {
            return this.editDateField;
        }
        set {
            this.editDateField = value;
            this.RaisePropertyChanged("EditDate");
        }
    }

    /// <remarks/>
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlIgnoreAttribute()]
    public bool EditDateSpecified {
        get {
            return this.editDateFieldSpecified;
        }
        set {
            this.editDateFieldSpecified = value;
            this.RaisePropertyChanged("EditDateSpecified");
        }
    }

    // code omitted for brevity...
}

As you can see, besides generating a backing property for EditDate, an additional <propertyname>Specified property is generated. All good, except that when I do the following:

DataContractBase myDataContract = new DataContractBase();
myDataContract.EditDate = DateTime.Now;

new MyServiceClient.Update(new UpdateRequest(myDataContract));

the EditDate was not getting picked up by the endpoint of the service (does not appear in the transmitted XML).

I debugged the code and found that, although I was setting EditDate, the EditDateSpecified property wasn't being set to true as I would expect; hence, the XML serializer was ignoring the value of EditDate, even though it's set to a valid value.

As a quick hack I modified the EditDate property to look like the following:

   /// <remarks/>
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElementAttribute(Order=0)]
    public System.DateTime EditDate {
        get {
            return this.editDateField;
        }
        set {
            this.editDateField = value;

            // hackhackhack
            if (value != default(System.DateTime))
            {
              this.EditDateSpecified = true;
            }
            // end hackhackhack

            this.RaisePropertyChanged("EditDate");
        }
    }

Now the code works as expected, but of course every time I re-generate the proxy, my modifications are lost. I could change the calling code to the following:

DataContractBase myDataContract = new DataContractBase();
myDataContract.EditDate = DateTime.Now;
myDataContract.EditDateSpecified = true;

new MyServiceClient.Update(new UpdateRequest(myDataContract));

but that also seems like a hack-ish waste of time.

So finally, my question: does anyone have a suggestion on how to get past this unintuitive (and IMO broken) behavior of the Visual Studio service proxy generator, or am I simply missing something?

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Add [XMLSerializerFormat] to attributes on your service: Check to this answer –  Mustafa Magdy Jan 21 '13 at 21:55
    
in case you copy/paste from comment by @MustafaMagdy -- it's [XmlSerializerFormat] (note the case) –  drzaus Jan 15 at 16:22
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6 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It might be a bit unintuitive (and caught me off guard and reeling, too!) - but it's the only proper way to handle elements that might or might not be specified in your XML schema.

And it also might seem counter-intuitive that you have to set the xyzSpecified flag yourself - but ultimately, this gives you more control, and WCF is all about the Four Tenets of SOA of being very explicit and clear about your intentions.

So basically - that's the way it is, get used to it :-) There's no way "past" this behavior - it's the way the WCF system was designed, and for good reason, too.

What you always can do is catch and handle the this.RaisePropertyChanged("EditDate"); event and set the EditDateSpecified flag in an event handler for that event.

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5  
It's still irritating though. grumbles like an old man –  Ian Kemp Nov 9 '09 at 9:02
    
would it be a violation to generate a warning when it looks like someone forgot the xyzSpecified? –  Aaron Anodide Aug 31 '10 at 21:12
1  
Wow, this is crazy unintuitive –  Adam Aug 13 '11 at 20:22
    
Agree this is the answer, disagree this is the only way/good design. This is crap design. They need to offer an option to have these set automatically in the setters for properties for simple use cases. –  Chris Moschini Feb 26 '13 at 6:27
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try this

[DataMember(IsRequired=true)]
public DateTime EditDate { get; set; }

This should omit the EditDateSpecified property since the field is specified as required

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Ian, Please ignore my previous answers, was explaining how to suck eggs. I've voted to delete them.

Could you tell me which version of Visual Studio you're using, please?

In VS2005 client - in the generated code, I get the <property>Specified flags, but no event raised on change of values. To pass data I have to set the <property>Specified flag.

In Visual Web Developer 2008 Express client - in the generated code, I get no <property>Specified flags, but I do get the event on change of value.

Seems to me that this functionality has evolved and the Web Dev 2008 is closer to what you're after and is more intuitive, in that you don't need to set flags once you've set a value.

Bowthy

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Here's a simple project that can modify the setters in generated WCF code for optional properties to automatically set the *Specified flags to true when setting the related value.

https://github.com/b9chris/WcfClean

Obviously there are situations where you want manual control over the *Specified flag so I'm not recommending it to everyone, but in most simple use cases the *Specified flags are just an extra nuisance and automatically setting them saves time, and is often more intuitive.

Note that Mustafa Magdy's comment on another answer here will solve this for you IF you control the Web Service publication point. However, I usually don't control the Web Service publication and am just consuming one, and have to cope with the *Specified flags in some simple software where I'd like this automated. Thus this tool.

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Change proxy class properties to nullable type

ex :

bool? confirmed

DateTime? checkDate

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Rather than change the setters of the autogenerated code, you can use an extension class to 'autospecify' (bind the change handler event). This could have two implementations -- a "lazy" one (Autospecify) using reflection to look for fieldSpecified based on the property name, rather than listing them all out for each class in some sort of switch statement like Autonotify:

Lazy

public static class PropertySpecifiedExtensions
{
    private const string SPECIFIED_SUFFIX = "Specified";

    /// <summary>
    /// Bind the <see cref="INotifyPropertyChanged.PropertyChanged"/> handler to automatically set any xxxSpecified fields when a property is changed.  "Lazy" via reflection.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="entity">the entity to bind the autospecify event to</param>
    /// <param name="specifiedSuffix">optionally specify a suffix for the Specified property to set as true on changes</param>
    /// <param name="specifiedPrefix">optionally specify a prefix for the Specified property to set as true on changes</param>
    public static void Autospecify(this INotifyPropertyChanged entity, string specifiedSuffix = SPECIFIED_SUFFIX, string specifiedPrefix = null)
    {
        entity.PropertyChanged += (me, e) =>
        {
            foreach (var pi in me.GetType().GetProperties().Where(o => o.Name == specifiedPrefix + e.PropertyName + specifiedSuffix))
            {
                pi.SetValue(me, true, BindingFlags.SetField | BindingFlags.SetProperty, null, null, null);
            }
        };
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Create a new entity and <see cref="Autospecify"/> its properties when changed
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="specifiedSuffix"></param>
    /// <param name="specifiedPrefix"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static T Create<T>(string specifiedSuffix = SPECIFIED_SUFFIX, string specifiedPrefix = null) where T : INotifyPropertyChanged, new()
    {
        var ret = new T();
        ret.Autospecify(specifiedSuffix, specifiedPrefix);
        return ret;
    }
}

This simplifies writing convenience factory methods like:

public partial class MyRandomClass 
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Create a new empty instance and <see cref="PropertySpecifiedExtensions.Autospecify"/> its properties when changed
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static MyRandomClass Create()
    {
        return PropertySpecifiedExtensions.Create<MyRandomClass>();
    }
}

A downside (other than reflection, meh) is that you have to use the factory method to instantiate your classes or use .Autospecify before (?) you make any changes to properties with specifiers.

No Reflection

If you don't like reflection, you could define another extension class + interface:

public static class PropertySpecifiedExtensions2
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Bind the <see cref="INotifyPropertyChanged.PropertyChanged"/> handler to automatically call each class's <see cref="IAutoNotifyPropertyChanged.Autonotify"/> method on the property name.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="entity">the entity to bind the autospecify event to</param>
    public static void Autonotify(this IAutoNotifyPropertyChanged entity)
    {
        entity.PropertyChanged += (me, e) => ((IAutoNotifyPropertyChanged)me).WhenPropertyChanges(e.PropertyName);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Create a new entity and <see cref="Autonotify"/> it's properties when changed
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static T Create<T>() where T : IAutoNotifyPropertyChanged, new()
    {
        var ret = new T();
        ret.Autonotify();
        return ret;
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// Used by <see cref="PropertySpecifiedExtensions.Autonotify"/> to standardize implementation behavior
/// </summary>
public interface IAutoNotifyPropertyChanged : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    void WhenPropertyChanges(string propertyName);
}

And then each class themselves defines the behavior:

public partial class MyRandomClass: IAutoNotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public void WhenPropertyChanges(string propertyName)
    {
        switch (propertyName)
        {
            case "field1": this.field1Specified = true; return;
            // etc
        }
    }
}

The downside to this is, of course, magic strings for property names making refactoring difficult, which you could get around with Expression parsing?

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