Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to understand in Perl the difference between a normal array reference \@array and [@array].

Covered in the following article, http://perl-begin.org/tutorials/perl-for-newbies/part2/, it says "An array surrounded by square brackets ([ @array ]) returns a dynamic reference to an array. This reference does not affect other values directly, which is why it is called dynamic. "
The last sentence above where it says the reference does not affect other values directly isn't clear to me, what other values are they refering to? A few websites copied and paste the same explanation. Can someone provide a better explanation that highlight the differences?

Here is an example they provided:

use strict;
use warnings;

sub vector_sum
{
    my $v1_ref = shift;
    my $v2_ref = shift;

    my @ret;

    my @v1 = @{$v1_ref};
    my @v2 = @{$v2_ref};

    if (scalar(@v1) != scalar(@v2))
    {
        return undef;
    }
    for(my $i=0;$i<scalar(@v1);$i++)
    {
        push @ret, ($v1[$i] + $v2[$i]);
    }

    return [ @ret ];
}

my $ret = vector_sum(
    [ 5, 9, 24, 30 ],
    [ 8, 2, 10, 20 ]
);

print join(", ", @{$ret}), "\n";

However, in the example given above, if I change the return [ @ret ]; to \@ret, the program returns the same result, so I am not sure how this serves as an example to illustrate dynamic reference.

Thanks.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I question that tutorial. When the perl docs use the term "dynamic", they are almost always referring to variable scope. You won't find consideration of a "dynamic arrayref" in perlref nor perlreftut.

That said:

\@array   # reference to @array
[@array]  # reference to an unnamed *copy* of @array

Consider what happens when we take a reference to, or a reference to a copy of, @ARGV:

$ perl -E '$a = \@ARGV; $a->[0] = "FOO"; say for @ARGV' blah blah
FOO
blah

$ perl -E '$a = [@ARGV]; $a->[0] = "FOO"; say for @ARGV' blah blah
blah
blah
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, these short snippets with comment and the sample cleared it up nicely. –  frank May 29 '13 at 2:27

I am trying to understand in Perl the difference between a normal array reference \@array and [@array].

They're both exactly the same kind of references; they just produce references to different arrays.

[ ... ]

is basically the same thing as

do { my @anon = (...); \@anon }

So

my @abc = qw( a b c );
my $ref1 = \@abc;
my $ref2 = [ @abc ];
say @$ref1, @$ref2;  # abcabc
@abc = qw( d e f );
say @$ref1, @$ref2;  # defabc

"This reference does not affect other values directly, which is why it is called dynamic. "

It's not called "dynamic", and that's not a definition of dynamic I've ever encountered.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, yeah that explanation looked funny, and it was copied and pasted in quite a few places. –  frank May 29 '13 at 2:27

Just a simple illustration:

my @array = (2, 3, 5, 6);
my $ref = \@array;
my $dynamic_ref = [@array];

print q{$array[1] = }, $array[1], "\n";
print q{$ref->[1] = }, $ref->[1], "\n";
print q{$dynamic_ref->[1] = }, $dynamic_ref->[1], "\n";

$array[1] = 10;
print "=" x 20, "\n";

print q{$array[1] = }, $array[1], "\n";
print q{$ref->[1] = }, $ref->[1], "\n";
print q{$dynamic_ref->[1] = }, $dynamic_ref->[1], "\n";

In other words you have a reference to the copy of original array and all changes to the original array doesn't affect this copy.

share|improve this answer
    
I see, thanks for the clear example. –  frank May 29 '13 at 2:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.