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I need to round a double to the nearest .5. I do not want to end up with a number ending in .0.

I've searched around for a bit, but it seems like everyone wants to round to the nearest multiple of .5 rather than just the nearest half but not whole. I tried dividing by .5, rounding that, and multiplying by .5, but this still rounds to multiples of .5. Adding or subtracting .5 after this will not always round the number where it should go (you might add when you should have subtracted).

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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What language are you using? –  Paul McLean May 29 '13 at 6:33
    
Ah, forgot to write that. Java. –  np98765 May 29 '13 at 6:34
3  
For me floor function, than adding 0.5 solves your issue. –  cerkiewny May 29 '13 at 6:34
    
What about 3.6, for example? It should go to 3.5, but now turns out to be 4.0. –  np98765 May 29 '13 at 6:39
    
@user2431245: Using @cerkiewny's solution? It works for me: Math.floor(3.6) + 0.5 == 3.5 –  Craig May 29 '13 at 6:47
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Subtract, round and add...

Math.round(value - 0.5) + 0.5

Another working way mentioned in question's comments:

Math.floor(value) + 0.5
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It is wrong round algorithm. Math.floor(3.1) + 0.5 will give you 3.5 instead of 3. –  Michael Liberman Aug 1 '13 at 15:17
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Exactly what he asked for. –  mauretto Aug 2 '13 at 9:39
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I think that Math.round(num * 2) / 2.0f should solve the rounding to the nearest half problem:

Math.round(3.9 * 2) / 2.0f == 8 / 2.0f = 4.0
Math.round(3.6 * 2) / 2.0f == 7 / 2.0f = 3.5
Math.round(3.1 * 2) / 2.0f == 6 / 2.0f = 3.0
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rounding to any fraction f:

double f = 0.5;
double rounded = f * Math.round(x/f);
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Yeah, I mentioned that in the question. Unfortunately, this doesn't work for whole numbers. –  np98765 May 29 '13 at 6:46
    
what is a whole number in your case? Do you mean integer? –  SatelliteSD May 29 '13 at 6:58
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