Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to extract latex code from files but I do not want the comments; (comments start with a %). Comments are all the way to the line ending but I do not want to remove a literal % (prepended by \ as in \%). How would I go about that? Ideally given this:

   Lamport and has become the dominant method for using \TeX; few
   people write in plain \TeX{} anymore. The current version is
   \LaTeXe. % this is a comment

   % This is a comment; it will not be shown in the final output.
   % The following shows a little of the typesetting power of LaTeX:
   \begin{align}
    E &= mc^2                              \\
    m &= \frac{m_0}{\sqrt{1-\frac{v^2}{c^2}}}
   \end{align}
   this is a \% literal symbol.

I would get :

   Lamport and has become the dominant method for using \TeX; few
   people write in plain \TeX{} anymore. The current version is
   \LaTeXe.


   \begin{align}
    E &= mc^2                              \\
    m &= \frac{m_0}{\sqrt{1-\frac{v^2}{c^2}}}
   \end{align}
   this is a \% literal symbol.

Is there a way to do that with Python?

EDIT after working solution, thanks to all of you.

   r'(.*)(?<!\\\)%.*'
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can do a regex replace of (?<!\\)%.*, but this is brittle, e.g. \verb!%! probably isn't a comment.

share|improve this answer
    
interesting, how many other corner cases are there other than 'verb'? is it a good idea to try to hunt them down and cover all of them? –  mike May 29 '13 at 9:01
    
Probably not. E.g. the listings package also has such a command and others can be defined as well. The only good way to parse LaTeX is to run it. That's the downside of Turing-complete document description languages. –  Joey May 29 '13 at 11:47

You can get inspiration from this answer on tex.stackechange.com. The idea is to:

  1. replace % with another non-colliding symbol between \begin{verbatim} and \end{verbatim} and in \verb|...|
  2. to use the (?<!\\)%.* regexp to remove the comments
  3. to change back the previous protected % symbols.

Note that in latex, the following

abc%comment
def

should be interpreted as

abcdef
share|improve this answer
    
i dont understand step 1, what is going on? –  mike May 29 '13 at 9:07
    
This is to protect % characters that are not starting comments, since % in \verb|| or in {verbatim} the % characters are not specials. The linked answer give code in Lisp to do what you want and it should be easier to understand than my pseudo-code description. –  Sylvain Defresne May 29 '13 at 18:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.