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<script>
window.onload=function(){
function nowTime(){
var s=0,m;
(function(){
s++;
m=Math.floor(s/60);
document.getElementById('t').innerHTML=(Math.floor(m/60))+':'+(m%60)+':'+(s%60);
setTimeout(arguments.callee,1000);
})();}
nowTime();}
</script>
<div id="t"></div>

This is for timing, i.e. to count how many seconds elapsed.
It is shown in HH:MM:SS.
Could anyone shorten it or accelerate it (I mean better performance)?

This code has 100ms delay for every 15 minutes. The following answers have similar time delays. This amount of time does not matter. It is pretty easy to calibrate the time if you want.

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closed as too localized by izb, Yoshi, Slanec, Quentin, h2ooooooo May 29 '13 at 9:17

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1  
Is this a code-golf question or you want this done for any other reason? –  Dogbert May 29 '13 at 8:44
    
Why do you define then call your function? –  Zeb Rawnsley May 29 '13 at 8:47
1  
"accelerate it (I mean fewer lines)" So performance is not a metric here? You know that even short code can result in horrible performance if done wrong? Short code does not mean fast code. Or do you actually need to speed this up? The usual way is to write more readable code, though. Short code is often cluttered and unreadable... –  Slanec May 29 '13 at 8:50
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
window.onload = function() {
    var s = 0, m, el = document.getElementById('t');
    (function next() {
        el.innerHTML = ~~((m = ~~(++s / 60)) / 60) + ':' + (m % 60) + ':' + (s % 60);
        setTimeout(next, 1000);
    })();
}
  1. Don't use arguments.callee, it's deprecated.
  2. Cache the DOM element.
  3. Math.floor can be replaced by ~~.
  4. Assigning a variable is an expression, which returns the value of RHS, so you can put m = ~~(++s / 60) in the first use of m.

And then you can uglify it (154 chars):

window.onload=function(){var n,t=0,e=document.getElementById("t")
!function o(){e.innerHTML=~~((n=~~(++t/60))/60)+":"+n%60+":"+t%60,setTimeout(o,1e3)}()}

Working demo: http://jsfiddle.net/PN9An/

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-1 line

window.onload = function () {
    function nowTime() {
        var s = 0,
            m;
        (function () {
            m = Math.floor(s / 60);
            document.getElementById('t').innerHTML = (Math.floor(m / 60)) + ':' + (m % 60) + ':' + (++s % 60);
            setTimeout(arguments.callee, 1000);
        })();
    }
    nowTime();
}

Edit: Remove redundant function definition > calling (-3 lines total)

window.onload = function () {
        var s = 0,
            m;
        (function () {
            m = Math.floor(s / 60);
            document.getElementById('t').innerHTML = (Math.floor(m / 60)) + ':' + (m % 60) + ':' + (++s % 60);
            setTimeout(arguments.callee, 1000);
        })();
}
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Write all in one line will result in fewer lines:

<script>window.onload=function(){function nowTime(){var s=0,m;(function(){s++;m=Math.floor(s/60);document.getElementById('t').innerHTML=(Math.floor(m/60))+':'+(m%60)+':'+(s%60);setTimeout(arguments.callee,1000);})();}nowTime();}</script><div id="t"></div>
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That does not actually what i need. You could see that it used to be a one-line code, and I just broke it into lines to paste here and ask this question –  Yang Guang May 29 '13 at 9:26
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Here you go sir:

var node=document.querySelector("#id");
var s=0,t={h:3600,m:60,s:1};
setInterval(function(){
  var r=s++;
  node.value=['h','m','s'].map(function(k){var v=Math.floor(r/t[k]);r-=v*t[k];return v+k;}).join("");
},1000);

I picked an input element to send the text result to. I'm not sure what type of element you're targetting, so you might need to change to node.value to node.textContent if necessary.

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