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My works relates to instrumentation of code fragments in python code. So in my work i would be writing a script in python such that I take another python file as input and insert any necessary code in the required place with my script.

The following code is a sample code of a file which i would be instrumenting:

A.py #normal un-instrumented code

statements
....
....

def move(self,a):
    statements
    ......
    print "My function is defined" 
    ......

statements 
......

My script what actually does is to check each lines in the A.py and if there is a "def" then a code fragment is instrumented on top of the code the def function

The following example is how the final out put should be:

A.py #instrumented code

statements
....
....

@decorator    #<------ inserted code
def move(self,a):
    statements
    ......
    print "My function is defined" 
    ......

statements 
......

But I have been resulted with different output. The following code is the final output which i am getting:

A.py #instrumented code

statements
....
....

@decorator    #<------ inserted code
def move(self,a):
    statements
    ......
    @decorator #<------ inserted code [this should not occur]
    print "My function is defined" 
    ......

statements 
......

I can understand that in the instrumented code it recognizes "def" in the word "defined" and so it instruments the a code above it.

In realty the instrumented code has lots of these problems I was not able to properly instrument the given python file. Is there any other way to differentiate the actual "def" from string?

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
How are you finding def in the instrumentation? If using a Regular Expresssion then try r'\bdef\b'. The \b marks a word boundary. –  cdarke May 29 '13 at 8:50
    
Will it work even when there is a statement like this print" This is a def" –  karthik May 29 '13 at 8:55
    
no. To deal with text embedded in quotes you will need negative look-arounds. –  cdarke May 29 '13 at 9:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use the ast module to parse the file properly.

This code prints the line number and column offset of each def statement:

import ast
with open('mymodule.py') as f:
    tree = ast.parse(f.read())
for node in ast.walk(tree):
    if isinstance(node, ast.FunctionDef):
        print node.lineno, node.col_offset
share|improve this answer
    
How do i use the column offset value when i am instrumenting a statement above the def function so that its is aligned correctly as the def function. –  karthik May 29 '13 at 9:14
1  
@karthik I'm not sure how tab characters affect col_offset; try it out. I think you need to copy col_offset characters from beginning of the line and use that string to indent @decorator. –  Janne Karila May 29 '13 at 9:33

You could use a Regular Expression. To avoid def inside quotes then you can use negative look-arounds:

import re

for line in open('A.py'):
    m = re.search(r"(?!<[\"'])\bdef\b(?![\"'])", line)
    if m:
        print r'@decorator    #<------ inserted code' 

    print line 

However, there might be other occurances of def that you or I can't think of, and if we are not careful we end-up writing the Python parser all over again. @Janne Karila's suggestion of using ast.parse is probably safer in the long term.

share|improve this answer
1  
Then there are multi-line strings. –  Janne Karila May 29 '13 at 9:34
    
@JanneKarila: yup, that's one I didn't think of. Which only goes to show that your answer is preferred. –  cdarke May 29 '13 at 9:42

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