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I wrote my own modified dietz return function to calculate the return on a portfolio with external cash movements. It seems to work correctly when compared to an excel solution but I have come accross a case where the result is wrong. My function returns 0.23% when the correct result is 0.30%.

Here is the function:

//Calculates the Modified-Dietz return given arrays of MIMO.
//MIMO is an associative array of dates to values
function modDietz($startDate, $endDate, $BMV, $EMV, $MIMO){
    if( strtotime($startDate) !== false ){
    //Date was passed as a string; convert it to php date
    $startDate = strtotime($startDate);
    }
    if( strtotime($endDate) !== false ){
    //Date was passed as a string; convert it to php date
    $endDate = strtotime($endDate);
    }

    //Convert seconds to days
    $CD = ($startDate - $endDate)/(60*60*24); 

    $i = 0;
    $SumWiFi = 0;
    $F = 0;
    foreach ($MIMO as $date=>$Fi){
        if( strtotime($date) !== false ){
          //Date was passed as a string; convert it to php date
          $date = strtotime($date);
        }
        //Only take into account the MIMO if it falls between the start and end dates.
        if ($date >= $startDate && $date <= $endDate){
            $Di = ($date - $startDate) / (60*60*24);
            $Wi = ($CD - $Di) / $CD;
            $SumWiFi += $Wi * $Fi;
            $F += $Fi;
        }
    }
    if ($BMV + $SumWiFi != 0) {
        return ($EMV - $BMV - $F)/($BMV + $SumWiFi);
    } else {
        return 0;
    }
}

And here is the data I fed it which is giving the wrong result:

Dates:
Array
(
    [0] => 2013-04-30
    [1] => 2013-03-31
)

Values:
Array
(
    [2013-03-31] => 4990430.0
    [2013-04-30] => 5991710.1
)

MIMO:
Array
(
    [2013-04-19] => -600.0
    [2013-04-23] => 1000000.0
    [2013-04-29] => -13750
)

This is the line that produces the result:

$mdReturn = modDietz($dates[1], $dates[0], $values[$dates[1]], $values[$dates[0]], $mimo);

I have a feeling the Money-Out on the 29th might be the cause - I'm not too sure of the best way to handle the dates in this function. At the moment I just use string-to-date on strings passed as format yyyy-mm-dd as shown in the above arrays.

Any idea where I'm going wrong here?

share|improve this question
    
Could daylight saving be causing date problems? –  Mark Baker May 29 '13 at 9:22
    
I'm not sure. I don't specify a time for a given date so I guess php assumes 2013-04-29 00:00:00. Would that make a difference? –  harryg May 29 '13 at 9:32
    
If your initial date was 2013-03-31 00:00:00 (1364684400), then you add 60*60*24 you get 1364770800, which is 2013-04-01 01:00:00 (That's based on UK daylight savings dates)... worse in October when the clocks go back again as you'll apparently end up with the same date when adding 24 hours because of locale times. Using DateTime objects and enforcing UST might eliminate the possibility of this causing any problems –  Mark Baker May 29 '13 at 9:45
    
yes but the function doesn't work like that. I'll do ($date - $startDate) / $CD which gives a ratio of how far $date is into the total period. It shouldn't really be affected by DST as an hour's difference will make negligible difference to the weighting given the return period is 1 month –  harryg May 29 '13 at 9:53
1  
But there will be one month where 31 days apparently equates to 2682000 seconds rather than 2678400, and another where it is 2674800 seconds... that's a potential margin for error between 100.13% and 99.867% - but simply trying to offer a way to eliminate a potential point of error –  Mark Baker May 29 '13 at 10:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think Mark Baker is right, try this:

function modDietz(DateTime $startDate, DateTime $endDate, $BMV, $EMV, $MIMO){
    $CD = $startDate->diff($endDate);
    $SumWiFi = 0;
    $F = 0;
    foreach ($MIMO as $date=>$Fi){
        $date = new DateTime($date);
        //Only take into account the MIMO if it falls between the start and end dates.
        if ($date >= $startDate && $date <= $endDate){
            $Di = $date->diff($startDate);
            $Wi = ($CD->d - $Di->d) / $CD->d;
            $SumWiFi += $Wi * $Fi;
            $F += $Fi;
        }
    }
    if ($BMV + $SumWiFi != 0) {
        return ($EMV - $BMV - $F)/($BMV + $SumWiFi);
    } else {
        return 0;
    }
}
$mimo = array(
    '2013-04-19' => -600.0,
    '2013-04-23' => 1000000.0,
    '2013-04-29' => -13750,
);
$startDate = new DateTime('2013-03-31');
$endDate = new DateTime('2013-04-30');
$result = modDietz($startDate, $endDate, 4990430.0, 5991710.1, $mimo);
// 0.0029925034725645
share|improve this answer
1  
That's great. Many thanks. Although I discovered it is better to use ->days rather than ->d on the diff objects for the case where the return period is greater than 1 month. Eg for when the $startdate/$enddate is 2013-03-31/2013-05-31 and $CD = $startDate->diff($endDate);, $CD->d gives 0 whilst $CD->days gives 61, which is correct. –  harryg May 29 '13 at 10:32

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