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I'm using the following code (via 'Dark Side of the Carton') to validate a reCAPTCHA field, before submitting the rest of a form that includes the captcha field.

The validation works fine, the 'recaptchavalidate' page is called, returns True or False correctly and the JavaScript picks this all up (I test this via alert(html);).

However, when True, the form doesn't continue to be sumbitted as you would expect. In fact, even worse, the reCAPTCHA refreshes as if the response was wrong.

I think it's my JavaScript at fault rather than the reCAPTCHA ... but where am I going wrong?

<script type="text/javascript">
    $(function(){
    	function validateCaptcha()
    	{
    	    challengeField = $("input#recaptcha_challenge_field").val();
    	    responseField = $("input#recaptcha_response_field").val();
    	    // alert(challengeField);
    	    // alert(responseField);
    	    //return false;
    	    var html = $.ajax({
    	    type: "POST",
    	    url: "recaptchavalidate",
    	    data: "recaptcha_challenge_field="+challengeField+ "&amp;recaptcha_response_field="+responseField,
    	    async: false
    	    }).responseText;

    	    if(html == "True")

    	    {
    	        $("#captchaStatus").html(" ");
    			alert(html);//test
    	        return true;
    	    }
    	    else
    	    {
    	        $("#captchaStatus").html("Your captcha is incorrect. Please try again");
    			alert(html);//test
    	        Recaptcha.reload();
    	        return false;
    	    }
    	}


    	$("#signup").submit(function(){
    		return validateCaptcha();
    });
    });

    </script>

EDIT: This is used only to check there are no errors before submitting. The reCAPTCHA is checked properly after submitting (via Python, not JS). So is not as big a security hole as some users have pointed out.

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the dark side link implies it returns the string "success" have you changed it and have you checked that your case and maybe trimmeed the string? –  Matt Smith Nov 5 '09 at 15:01
    
Yes, I'm aware I changed the string, but both the js and page are receiving and sending what's expected. –  Jon Hadley Nov 5 '09 at 18:36
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+100

It seems that your test of html == "True" isn't passing. Are you sure that that is the exact string you're getting back is "True" with no extra characters/whitespace? If there is whitespace on the beginning or the end of the string, for example, the pass will fail but it will still look like "True" if you show the text via an alert box.

Try trimming whitespace from the end of the string by using this check instead:

if (html.replace(/^\s+|\s+$/, '') == "True")
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Instead of alerting "html", hard-code "true" and "false" so you're sure it's getting to the correct spot.

if(html == "True")
{
    $("#captchaStatus").html(" ");
            alert("true");//test
    return true;
}
else
{
    $("#captchaStatus").html("Your captcha is incorrect. Please try again");
            alert("false");//test
    Recaptcha.reload();
    return false;
}

Then report back with your findings.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand what you mean (that code is the same as mine). I'm pretty sure it's getting the right spot, as those alerts fire as expected. –  Jon Hadley Nov 5 '09 at 18:24
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I can't wait to encounter this in real world. :)

Then I will hack your javascript and just replace validateCaptcha() with

function validateCaptcha() {
  return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
you make a valid point (though why not disable JS - it's easier and a more common thing than modifying it), but I've considered doing something similar but also validating on the full post. The benefit of validating client side first is you can tell them it's wrong before they've lost the password they entered. –  Matt Nov 5 '09 at 15:45
    
Yeah I know all that was just a for fun posting –  jitter Nov 5 '09 at 15:49
1  
The reCAPTCHA is checked properly after submitting (via Python, not JS), so while a valid point, your code wouldn't get round my form :) As Matt points out, it's a client side check before sending the whole form. –  Jon Hadley Nov 5 '09 at 18:20
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Maybe you have

onclick="validateCaptcha();"

instead of

onclick="return validateCaptcha();"

so that the parent element's (link, button, form) default action always get invoked.

If that's all fine as well, then the only causes which I can see is that the form submit did fire an incorrect request or the server handled the request incorrectly. Check with a HTTP monitor/analyzer tool/plugin what kind of request exactly is been invoked after the 'true' outcome of the captcha validation. It at least sounds like that it fired for example a plain GET request instead of a POST request to the server and/or that the server ignored the particular request because it didn't recognize the URL pattern and/or the request parameters.

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Or even simple I would disable my javascript and submit the form.

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