Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two relative positioned DIVs A & B. a has a DIV as child element called A' which is absolute positioned and has a z-index of 1000. DIV B' is a child element of DIV B and positioned absolute as well.

Firefox renders this as expected: A'-B'-B-A(from nearest to farest from the user) However, in IE7 I get: B'-B-A'-A

Please can someone help me out with a workaround? I've already wasted hours with this problem!

Thanks in advance, Stephan

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The issue is that in IE7 and earlier, it basically "resets" the z-index inside of relative positioned items.

If none of these work see 'The Last Resort' below

so in IE in this case the BAR would be above FOO in IE7's lame indexing method:

<div style="position:relative;">
  <div style="position:absolute; z-index:1000;">FOO</div>
</div>
<div style="position:relative;">
  <div style="position:absolute; z-index:1;">BAR</div>
</div>

The workaround is equally lame; You have to make sure the parent of the items you want to be on top are z-indexed higher than the parents of the one you want on the bottom.:

<div style="position:relative; z-index:2;">
  <div style="position:absolute; z-index:1000;">FOO</div>
</div>
<div style="position:relative; z-index:1">
  <div style="position:absolute; z-index:1;">BAR</div>
</div>

OR you can swap which one comes first in the HTML causing one to be rendered over the other.

<div style="position:relative;">
  <div style="position:absolute; z-index:1;">BAR</div>
</div>
<div style="position:relative;">
  <div style="position:absolute; z-index:1000;">FOO</div>
</div>

NOTE: This is all assuming that you're doing something with FOO and BAR that are causing them to overlap. My example clearly does not overlap so the effect would be hard to see if you copied and pasted it outright.

ADDED:

The Last Resort

To put it simply, this option sucks. But it's the only option if you absolutely must deal with this issue in IE7 and earlier.

Use JavaScript to move your div and position it where it needs to be. The basic idea here is to pull the absolute positioned div out to the body node and move it to where it needs to be. I would HIGHLY recommend using jQuery to do all of this. I made the example code without jQuery, but if you're not using jQuery yet, you should start. It will get this job done in a few lines.

<body>
    <div style="position:relative; z-index:2;"> 
    	OUTERFOO 
    	<div style="position:absolute; z-index:1000; background:red;">
    		FOO
    	</div> 
    </div> 
    <div style="position:relative; z-index:1">
    	OUTERBAR 
    	<div id="bar" style="position:absolute; top:-30px; z-index:1; background:green;">
    		BAR
    	</div>
    </div>
    <button onclick="moveThisCrapForIE7();">Test</button>
    <script type="text/javascript" language="javascript">
    	// Probably best to kick this off when your body is totally loaded.
    	// jQuery's $(document).ready is really good for that.
    	// for now I'm just using a button to test.
    	function moveThisCrapForIE7() {
    		// You'll need something more reliable for browser detection here, this will only get IE7 not IE6.
    		// I'd recommend jQuery for everything really. It'll save you miles of code.
    		if(navigator.appVersion.indexOf('MSIE 7') > -1) {
    			// Get your element and move it to where you want it.
    			var bar = document.getElementById('bar');
    			document.body.appendChild(bar);
    			//Then you'll need to monkey with the location 
    			// to make sure it's where you want it.
    			bar.style.top = '15px';
    			bar.style.left = '90px';
    			bar.style.zIndex = '3';
    		}
    	}
    </script>
</body>
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I was going to answer it too. This bug haunted me a few days ago, and I used the first approach to workaround this issue. It works ok on IE8 (standards mode) tho. –  wtaniguchi Nov 5 '09 at 15:13
    
Thanks for your answer, but the problem still remains: <div style="position:relative; z-index:2;"> OUTERFOO <div style="position:absolute; z-index:1000;">FOO</div> </div> <div style="position:relative; z-index:1">OUTERBAR <div style="position:absolute; z-index:1;">BAR</div> </div> I want FOO to stack over BAR without OUTERFOO stacking over OUTERBAR. –  Stephan Nov 5 '09 at 15:17
    
+1; the second solution solved my problems with this! –  ullmark Nov 30 '09 at 13:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.