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I am working on trying to optimize some queries and am getting some puzzling results (probably stemming from my limited understanding of the inner workings of MySQL).

The baffling thing (at least to me at this point) is that when I was trying to dissect the complete query to optimize it I found that the inner select query (the sub-query) runs much, much more slowly on its own; I thought that the simpler query would run faster. Bellow are the queries and my results:

The Complete Query

SELECT r.id, r.serve_url, r.title, r.category_id, GROUP_CONCAT(hr.server_id) AS server_id
FROM hosted_resources hr
LEFT JOIN resources AS r ON (hr.resource_id = r.id)
WHERE hr.resource_id = (
    select id from resources
    where resource_type_id = 1
    and category_id = 1
    and id < 311
    order by date_added desc
    limit 1
)
GROUP BY r.id, r.serve_url, r.title, r.category_id;

result of the EXPLAIN query:

+----+-------------+-----------+-------+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------+----------------------------------------------+---------+-------+------+-----------------------------------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table     | type  | possible_keys                                                                 | key                                          | key_len | ref   | rows | Extra                                                     |
+----+-------------+-----------+-------+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------+----------------------------------------------+---------+-------+------+-----------------------------------------------------------+
|  1 | PRIMARY     | hr        | ref   | hosted_resources_resource_id_resource_id_idx,hosted_resources_resource_id_idx | hosted_resources_resource_id_resource_id_idx | 4       | const |    2 | Using where; Using index; Using temporary; Using filesort |
|  1 | PRIMARY     | r         | const | PRIMARY                                                                       | PRIMARY                                      | 4       | const |    1 |                                                           |
|  2 | SUBQUERY    | resources | ref   | PRIMARY,type_idx,category_idx,type_category_idx,type_category_date_idx        | type_category_date_idx                       | 8       |       |   87 | Using where; Using index                                  |
+----+-------------+-----------+-------+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------+----------------------------------------------+---------+-------+------+-----------------------------------------------------------+

Benchmarking results:

Concurrency Level:      5000
Time taken for tests:   9.396 seconds
Complete requests:      100000
Failed requests:        0
Write errors:           0
Non-2xx responses:      100000
Total transferred:      31900000 bytes
HTML transferred:       16900000 bytes
Requests per second:    10642.78 [#/sec] (mean)
Time per request:       469.802 [ms] (mean)
Time per request:       0.094 [ms] (mean, across all concurrent requests)
Transfer rate:          3315.47 [Kbytes/sec] received

The Sub-Query (which I had expected to run faster)

select id, serve_url, title, category_id from resources
where resource_type_id = 1
and category_id = 1
and id < 311
order by date_added desc
limit 1

Results of the EXPLAIN query:

+----+-------------+-----------+------+------------------------------------------------------------------------+------------------------+---------+-------------+------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table     | type | possible_keys                                                          | key                    | key_len | ref         | rows | Extra       |
+----+-------------+-----------+------+------------------------------------------------------------------------+------------------------+---------+-------------+------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | resources | ref  | PRIMARY,type_idx,category_idx,type_category_idx,type_category_date_idx | type_category_date_idx | 8       | const,const |   87 | Using where |
+----+-------------+-----------+------+------------------------------------------------------------------------+------------------------+---------+-------------+------+-------------+

Benchmarking results:

Concurrency Level:      5000
Time taken for tests:   42.181 seconds
Complete requests:      100000
Failed requests:        0
Write errors:           0
Total transferred:      41800000 bytes
HTML transferred:       27100000 bytes
Requests per second:    2370.75 [#/sec] (mean)
Time per request:       2109.040 [ms] (mean)
Time per request:       0.422 [ms] (mean, across all concurrent requests)
Transfer rate:          967.75 [Kbytes/sec] received

The resources table:

CREATE TABLE `resources` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `date_added` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP COMMENT 
  `resource_type_id` int(11) NOT NULL COMMENT,
  `resource_status_id` int(11) NOT NULL COMMENT 
  `is_hosted` bit(1) NOT NULL COMMENT 
  `category_id` int(11) NOT NULL COMMENT 
  `serve_url` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL COMMENT 
  `title` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL COMMENT 
  `parent_resource_id` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  UNIQUE KEY `serve_url_UNIQUE` (`serve_url`),
  KEY `type_idx` (`resource_type_id`),
  KEY `status_idx` (`resource_status_id`),
  KEY `category_idx` (`category_id`),
  KEY `resources_parent_resource_id_idx` (`parent_resource_id`),
  KEY `type_category_idx` (`resource_type_id`,`category_id`),
  KEY `date_added_idx` (`date_added`),
  KEY `type_category_date_idx` (`resource_type_id`,`category_id`,`date_added`),
  CONSTRAINT `resources_category_id` FOREIGN KEY (`category_id`) REFERENCES `categories` (`id`) ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE NO ACTION,
  CONSTRAINT `resources_parent_resource_id` FOREIGN KEY (`parent_resource_id`) REFERENCES `resources` (`id`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE,
  CONSTRAINT `resources_resource_status_id` FOREIGN KEY (`resource_status_id`) REFERENCES `resource_statuses` (`id`) ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE NO ACTION,
  CONSTRAINT `resources_resource_type_id` FOREIGN KEY (`resource_type_id`) REFERENCES `resource_types` (`id`) ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE NO ACTION
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=598 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

Any toughs would be much, much appreciated. kate

share|improve this question
    
which indexes do you have on the tables ? First thing I am seeing on the explain , is that the second query is not using any indexes, meanwhile is uses one in the first query which explain the much faster time –  Ph.T May 29 '13 at 15:08
    
Ph.T - I have added the table structure. –  Kate May 29 '13 at 15:18
    
I want to understand the structure of your DB , how many records approx of type "resource_type_id = 1 and category_id = 1" and of type "id < 311" do you have in the database ? how many total recods do you have in the table ? how often do you need to use this query ? do you use many other queries ? the point is , may be the indexes you have are not usefull, maybe we can give a hint to mysql –  Ph.T May 29 '13 at 15:32
    
@Kate . . . What version of MySQL are you using? Version 5.6 introduced some new optimization methods, and it might be recognizing your construct as a correlated subquery. –  Gordon Linoff May 29 '13 at 15:32
    
Is the question here why the subquery runs slower on its own or is it how to optimize the whole thing, or both? –  N.B. May 29 '13 at 15:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your queries are not comparable, when you are running the subqery on it's own it has additional columns, I believe this is where the difference arises, you can see the extra for the subquery in the EXPLAIN for your main query has:

Using where; Using index

When you run the subquery on it's own with additional columns it only shows:

Using where

The reason for this is that your nonclustered indexes only store the indexed columns, and the primary key, so your index:

KEY `type_category_date_idx` (`resource_type_id`,`category_id`,`date_added`)

has enough information in to satisfy your entire subquery:

SELECT  ID
FROM    Resources
WHERE   resource_type_id = 1
AND     category_id = 1
AND     id < 311
ORDER BY date_added DESC

It is therefore not necessary to refer back to the table data. When you add more columns to the select list the index no longer holds all the information required to satisfy the query, and the query needs to perform a bookmark lookup back to the table data using the list of ids from the index, and find the data in the relevant columns.

This is what the My SQL Docs say about Using Index:

The column information is retrieved from the table using only information in the index tree without having to do an additional seek to read the actual row. This strategy can be used when the query uses only columns that are part of a single index.

If the Extra column also says Using where, it means the index is being used to perform lookups of key values. Without Using where, the optimizer may be reading the index to avoid reading data rows but not using it for lookups. For example, if the index is a covering index for the query, the optimizer may scan it without using it for lookups.

You should see that if you run your subquery only using SELECT ID FROM... that you get the same plan as in the main query, and a much quicker execution time than running it with additional columns.

EDIT

In terms of actually optimising your query, I think you can change your LEFT JOIN to an INNER JOIN since you know the ID must exist inresources based on the WHERE clause. Other than that, I don't see much scope for imrpovement, although I believe MySQL will deal with JOINs better than a subquery in the where Clause, so the following may perform better:

SELECT  r.id, r.serve_url, r.title, r.category_id, GROUP_CONCAT(hr.server_id) AS server_id
FROM    resources r
        INNER JOIN
        (   SELECT  ID
            FROM    Resources
            WHERE   resource_type_id = 1
            AND     category_id = 1
            AND     id < 311
            ORDER BY date_added DESC
            LIMIT 1
        ) MaxR
            ON MaxR.ID = r.ID
        INNER JOIN hosted_resources hr
            ON hr.resource_id = r.id
GROUP BY r.id, r.serve_url, r.title, r.category_id;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That was a silly omission/change on my part. The query did execute much faster without the extra columns. –  Kate May 29 '13 at 16:29

try removing the key:

KEY `type_category_date_idx` (`resource_type_id`,`category_id`,`date_added`)

This key contains other keys stated above. From what I know mysql can use 2 different keys at once. If these three are very frequently used for lookups into this table the key may not be so simple to remove.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, originally I didn't have that index, but have added it based on the EXPLAIN results. The benchmarking results showed a speed up of about 5 seconds. –  Kate May 29 '13 at 15:52
    
Keep in mind when running your benchmarks not to restart mysql. Depending on your table types it needs to be accessed many times to load all the tables into RAM and a restart with flush those caches. –  beiller May 29 '13 at 16:20

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