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I have been banging my head against the wall on this one, I am fairly new to regex and am a bit out of my depth. I am working with this network compliance software that doesn't allow for matching multiple criteria in a field however does accept regular expressions.

!(?!.*FastEthernet[0-24].[0-24]\.[0-250])

The software parses all information until it matches the expressed criteria. So in my case I want it to match ! unless it is followed by a sub interface FastEthernet#/#.# where # is any number.

Here is my data

interface FastEthernet0/0
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet0/0.100
ip address 192.168.1.100
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
shutdown
!
share|improve this question
    
Be very, very careful using .* in a regex. .* matches everything. .*? is safer, but even that is pretty dangerous. Always try to make a regex that does not include .* if you can. –  Joe May 29 '13 at 15:10
    
Do you want to match only the last ! in your example? –  Jerry May 29 '13 at 15:11
    
My target is to match the second ! –  Luky May 29 '13 at 15:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should do it:

!(?!\s*interface FastEthernet\d/\d\.\d)

See this running on rubular

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What does the (?s) part do if you don't mind me asking? –  mart1n May 29 '13 at 15:15
    
@mart1n it allows . to match newline characters (which it wouldn't normally be allowed to), but it shouldn't be necessary in this particular case. –  Ian Roberts May 29 '13 at 15:22
    
In that case, shouldn't your expression match an (optional) new line after the !? Also, you should probably escape the . and /. –  mart1n May 29 '13 at 15:24
    
@mart1n good call on the escape dot (fixed), but I think the optional newline is covered, because \s includes newlines. –  Bohemian May 29 '13 at 15:30
    
I tested this and it did not seem to work, not sure if it is the software or your expression. Your expression matched all 3 lines –  Luky May 29 '13 at 15:31

I would use this:

!(?!(.|\n|\r)*FastEthernet\d\d?\/\d\d?\.\d{1,3})

It seems to work for me.

share|improve this answer
    
@Luky I removed the (?s). Could you try this one? –  Jerry May 29 '13 at 16:45
    
Thank you for the help, however it seems to be a problem with the software so I can't identify whether it works. –  Luky May 29 '13 at 17:21
    
@Luky Sounds like a terribad problem then :( I hope you get it sorted out soon! –  Jerry May 29 '13 at 17:23
    
Yeah luckily the developer is quick to reply –  Luky May 29 '13 at 17:25

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