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I was reading through online for the reason as to why multiple inheritance is not allowed in Java and the following example was given to illustrate it:

class A { 
   public void doSomething() { 
   } 
} 

class B { 
     public void doSomething() { 
     } 
} 

class C extends A,B { 

} 

public static void main(String args) { 
     C c = new C(); 
     c.doSoemthing();   // compiler doesnt know which doSeomthing to call.

The above example illustrates what we call a diamond problem where by both parent classes have the same method name. when a child class tries to retrieve it, the compiler gets confused.

My question is, how will an interface solve this kind of problem ?

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3  
The interface doesn't solve this, instead prevents this scenario. –  Luiggi Mendoza May 29 '13 at 15:31
1  
Interesting read about multiple inheritance, default methods and Java 8: lambdafaq.org/what-about-the-diamond-problem –  assylias May 29 '13 at 15:31
    
+1 @luiggi mendonza , that is the exact answer. –  The New Idiot May 29 '13 at 15:39
    
Another way of looking at it is to try to rewrite the JLS, especially Section 15.12 Method Invocation Expressions to show rules for dealing with multiple inheritance of implementation. –  Patricia Shanahan May 29 '13 at 15:42
    
thank you all for the wonderful answers –  Stranger May 29 '13 at 16:01
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7 Answers

It's not fair to say that multiple inheritance achieved through interfaces in java

Java support only multiple interface inheritance, and java does not support multiple inheritance.

You should see In mixin inheritance, one class is specifically designed to be used as one of the classes in a multiple inheritance scheme.

http://csis.pace.edu/~bergin/patterns/multipleinheritance.html

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2  
The link dates from year 2000 but is a good example about the topic. –  Luiggi Mendoza May 29 '13 at 15:50
    
Yeah..that is very old but gold :). –  sᴜʀᴇsʜ ᴀᴛᴛᴀ May 29 '13 at 16:08
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Lets think about the following code

interface P { 
   public void doSomething();
} 

interface Q { 
     public void doSomething();
} 
class A { 
   public void doSomething() { 
   } 
} 

class B { 
     public void doSomething() { 
     } 
} 

class C implements P,Q { 
     public void doSomething(){
         // implementation
     }
}

class D extends A,B {   // suppose it is possible


}

now to use object of C you have the implementation of doSomething() in C class. Which is only implemented in C class.

But if you could create an object of D and call doSomething which method should be called? as this method is implemented in both A and B.

Diamond Problem

actually the real diamon problem is

class A { 
   public void doSomething() { 
   } 
} 

class B extends A{ 
     public void doSomething() { 
     } 
} 

class C extends A{ 
     public void doSomething() { 
     } 
} 


class D extends B,C {   // suppose it is possible
   // no implementation of doSomething.
}

enter image description here

it is called diamond because of it's diamond shape. Here if you want to do following

D d = new D();
d.doSomething(); // which method should be called now????

From wikipedia here is a nice real time example

For example, in the context of GUI software development, a class Button may inherit from both classes Rectangle (for appearance) and Clickable (for functionality/input handling), and classes Rectangle and Clickable both inherit from the Object class. Now if the equals method is called for a Button object and there is no such method in the Button class but there is an overridden equals method in both Rectangle and Clickable, which method should be eventually called?

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The interface does not implement the doSomething() method, so you cannot call an interface method. Interface is a mere signature what methods to implement in the actuall (implementing) class. You would implement the doSomething() in your class C and that would be the method you are calling when invoking B.doSomething() or A.doSomething().

In the case of extending two claasses with two doSomething() methods, they could be having different implementations and you would not know which one is invoked. See this example:

class A { 
   public void doSomething() { 
       System.out.println("A");
   } 
} 

class B { 
   public void doSomething() { 
       System.out.println("B");
   } 
} 

class C extends A & B { //if this would be an option

} 

public static void main(String args) { 
    C c = new C(); 
    c.doSoemthing();   //Print "A" or "B" ???
}

Conclusion: It's an implementation thing. Interfaces do not offer any implementation for any method, so it's safe to inherit from interfaces having the same method signatures.

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Multiple inheritance can inherit member data from many classes as well as all their functions. Multiple interfaces can only inherit function prototypes and they must be implemented by the child class.

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1  
Java has no functions, methods instead. And you don't inherit the methods, the class implementor is meant to define the behavior of the methods. –  Luiggi Mendoza May 29 '13 at 15:29
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An interface has no implementation of the method, and thus they both will be merged into the same method. In fact, your object promises to implement a method called doSomething, but not tied to specifically one of the interfaces (serves both)

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Answer lies in your question itself. In case of interface compiler does not get confused as there is no implementation in your interface. Its your concrete class which will provide the actual implementation .Hence no confusion.

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Both classes provide code that the JVM can jump to when the call is made. This is where the ambiguity lies. Same problem with attributes, the compiler might have two attributes with the same name to look into, which will give a similar ambiguity.

An interface will not provide that code. Hence there will be no conflict.

Other languages that support multiple inheritance makes the compiler prohibit these ambiguities when they arise. And resolving them needs to be made ad hoc. I.e.

class C{
    public void doSomething(){   
       // Call  (this inferred)
       B.doSomething();
       // leave A.doSomething() alone. 
    }
}
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