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I have an array where discreet sinewave values are recorded and stored. I want to find the max and min of the waveform. Since the sinewave data is recorded voltages using a DAQ, there will be some noise, so I want to do a weighted average. Assuming self.yArray contains my sinewave values, here is my code so far:

filterarray = []
filtersize = 2
length = len(self.yArray)
for x in range (0, length-(filtersize+1)):
   for y in range (0,filtersize):
      summation = sum(self.yArray[x+y])
      ave = summation/filtersize
      filterarray.append(ave)

My issue seems to be in the second for loop, where depending on my averaging window size (filtersize), I want to sum up the values in the window to take the average of them. I receive an error saying:

summation = sum(self.yArray[x+y])
TypeError: 'float' object is not iterable

I am an EE with very little experience in programming, so any help would be greatly appreciated!

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What are you expecting sum(self.yArray[x+y]) to do? –  nims May 29 '13 at 18:14
1  
Also checkout the moving average recipe from collections.deque. –  undefined is not a function May 29 '13 at 18:22
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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

self.yArray[x+y] is returning a single item out of the self.yArray list. If you are trying to get a subset of the yArray, you can use the slice operator instead:

summation = sum(self.yArray[x:y])

to return an iterable that the sum builtin can use.

A bit more information about python slices can be found here (scroll down to the "Sequences" section): http://docs.python.org/2/reference/datamodel.html#the-standard-type-hierarchy

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Thank you, after fixing this and playing around with it I was able to get it to work without having to do any convolution –  Brett Prudhom May 29 '13 at 18:38
1  
Great to hear. I would recommend you look at @tom10 's answer though, he has a solution using numpy. In the python community, numpy is the tool to use for things like this. –  Paul Woolcock May 29 '13 at 18:49
    
@Paul, thanks for the recommendation. It should be noted though, that although x:y doesn't produce an error, it won't give the expected result in the OP's code. Either OP would need to use your correction, but with y=x+filtersize and taken out of the loop; or the sum should be removed, with the x+y indexing left in place. –  tom10 May 30 '13 at 17:18
    
@tom10, I'm sure you are right. My answer was mostly going off some intuition about what the problem most likely was, I am not knowledgable about the problem domain to know the accuracy of the actual algorithm. Which is why I referred the OP to your answer. –  Paul Woolcock May 30 '13 at 17:22
1  
@Paul. OK, I added the corrections to my answer then. –  tom10 May 30 '13 at 23:33
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The other answers correctly describe your error, but this type of problem really calls out for using numpy. Numpy will run faster, be more memory efficient, and is more expressive and convenient for this type of problem. Here's an example:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

# make a sine wave with noise
times = np.arange(0, 10*np.pi, .01)
noise = .1*np.random.ranf(len(times))
wfm = np.sin(times) + noise

# smoothing it with a running average in one line using a convolution
#    using a convolution, you could also easily smooth with other filters
#    like a Gaussian, etc.
n_ave = 20
smoothed = np.convolve(wfm, np.ones(n_ave)/n_ave, mode='same')

plt.plot(times, wfm, times, -.5+smoothed)
plt.show()

enter image description here

If you don't want to use numpy, it should also be noted that there's a logical error in your program that results in the TypeError. The problem is that in the line

summation = sum(self.yArray[x+y])

you're using sum within the loop where your also calculating the sum. So either you need to use sum without the loop, or loop through the array and add up all the elements, but not both (and it's doing both, ie, applying sum to the indexed array element, that leads to the error in the first place). That is, here are two solutions:

filterarray = []
filtersize = 2
length = len(self.yArray)
for x in range (0, length-(filtersize+1)):
    summation = sum(self.yArray[x:x+filtersize]) # sum over section of array
    ave = summation/filtersize
    filterarray.append(ave)

or

filterarray = []
filtersize = 2
length = len(self.yArray)
for x in range (0, length-(filtersize+1)):
    summation = 0.
    for y in range (0,filtersize):
        summation = self.yArray[x+y]
    ave = summation/filtersize
    filterarray.append(ave)
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You could use numpy, like:

import numpy
filtersize = 2
ysums = numpy.cumsum(numpy.array(self.yArray, dtype=float))
ylags = numpy.roll(ysums, filtersize)
ylags[0:filtersize] = 0.0
moving_avg = (ysums - ylags) / filtersize
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Your original code attempts to call sum on the float value stored at yArray[x+y], where x+y is evaluating to some integer representing the index of that float value.

Try: summation = sum(self.yArray[x:y])

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Indeed numpy is the way to go. One of the nice features of python is list comprehensions, allowing you to do away with the typical nested for loop constructs. Here goes an example, for your particular problem...

import numpy as np
step=2
res=[np.sum(myarr[i:i+step],dtype=np.float)/step for i in range(len(myarr)-step+1)]
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