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If I am not mistaken, the conventional way of writing classes in C++ is as follows (this is just an illustrative example):

MyClass.h

// MyClass.h

#ifndef MY_CLASS_H
#define MY_CLASS_H

class MyClass
{
public:
    MyClass();
    MyClass(int);
    void method1(int);
    int method2();

private:
    int field;
};

#endif

MyClass.cpp

// MyClass.cpp 

#include "MyClass.h"

MyClass::MyClass()
{
    field = 0;
}

MyClass::MyClass(int n)
{
    field = n;
}

void MyClass::method1(int n)
{
    field = n;
}

int MyClass::method2()
{
    return field;
}

main.cpp

// main.cpp

#include <iostream>

#include "MyClass.h"

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    MyClass mc;

    mc.method1(2);
    cout << mc.method2();

    return 0;
}

What is the conventional C# equivalent of this project? Also, if I have made a mistake portraying conventionally correct C++ in the above example, please fix it to help prevent confusing future readers.

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closed as not constructive by marc_s, Erno de Weerd, Dour High Arch, George Duckett, Endoro May 30 '13 at 10:01

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2  
Well, C# doesn't have header files, so it's like the above, but with the class definition in one place. –  Oliver Charlesworth May 29 '13 at 18:20
    
Equivalent in what way? Same output? –  Erno de Weerd May 29 '13 at 18:22
1  
I usually declare all of my fields/properties at the top of my class and methods below. It depends on the standards you want to adhere to when coding though. –  Cameron Tinker May 29 '13 at 18:24
    
I mean equivalent in terms of structure; I wrote a class with field and method definitions and implementations, which are stored in different files based on the current convention. –  Junior Programmer May 29 '13 at 18:28
1  
Well, you could use partial classes if you want to separate out things like that, but that's really creating unnecessary work for yourself and your teammates. Normally everything for a given class is defined in one *.cs file. –  Tim May 29 '13 at 18:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In C#, all declarations are inline, and the access specifiers like "private" and "public" are included on each member declaration; in C#, public, private, protected, and internal are modifiers on a member, just like static is in either language:

    public class MyClass
    {
        //  ...

        /// <summary>
        /// The "///<summary>" convention is recognized by the IDE, which
        /// uses the text to generate context help for the member. 
        /// 
        /// As TyCobb notes below, method1 in correct C# idiom is more 
        /// likely to be a property than a method -- and the field "backing"
        /// it would be given the same name, but with the first letter 
        /// lowercased and prefixed with an underscore. 
        /// </summary>
        public int Property1
        {
            get { return _property1; }
            set { _property1 = value; }
        }
        private int _property1 = 0;

        private bool _flag1 = false;

        // Regions are a convenience. They don't affect compilation. 
        #region Public Methods
        /// <summary>
        /// Do something arbitrary
        /// </summary>
        public void Method2()
        {
        }
        #endregion Public Methods
    }

Private is the default. Note that you can put initializers on field declarations.

There is no direct equivalent to the .h/.cpp distinction, though there are such things as "partial classes", where some of members of a given class are defined in one place, and more members are defined elsewhere. Usually that's done if a class has some members defined by generated code, and others defined in handwritten code.

It's a good idea to put related stuff together (event handlers, methods that access web services, whatever) in "regions":

    #region INotifyPropertyChanged Implementation
    // ...declare methods which implement interface INotifyPropertyChanged
    #endregion INotifyPropertyChanged Implementation

Regions are more than just a funny comment syntax, but not much more: The compiler requires #region/#endregion pairs to match, and the Microsoft IDE will give you a little plus sign in the margin to collapse/expand regions. Naming them is optional, but a very good idea, to keep track of what's what. You can nest them, so you need to keep track.

I'm initializing everything explicitly, but that's C# does implicitly initialize fields and variables to a standard default value for the type: the default for numeric types is zero, the default for any reference type is null, etc. You can get that value for any given type with default(int), default(string), etc.

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Here is a link that shows the coding conventions for C#. This is a good place to start but each company has their own coding conventions

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using System;
//using ... more stuff as necessary;

public class MyClass
{
    public MyClass()
    {
        // Unlike C++, fields are initialized to zero.
    }

    public MyClass(int n)
    {
         field = n;
    }

    public void method1(int n)
    {
         field = n;
    }

    public int method2()
    {
         return field;
    }

    private int field;
};
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using namespace1;
using namespace2;

namespace MyNamespace
{
    public class MyClass
    {
        //Fields at the top. Private is optional as it is private by default.
        private int field;

        //Properties next
        //This actually replaces your Method properties in your example.
        public int Field 
        { 
            get { return field; }
            set { field = value; }
        }

        //If you don't need special logic, you can use an auto property
        //instead of using a backing field.
        public int SomeProperty {get; set;}

        //Constructor if needed. It is optional.
        public MyClass()
        {
        }

        //Methods next
        public void SomeMethod()
        {
           //Do something
        }

    }
}

Everyone has their own little standard, but this is pretty much the basic.

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