Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm missing something here. I get that one would use .NET compliant types in public interfaces and methods so that .NET languages can play nicely together (for example, "System.String", not C#'s "string").

If one uses .NET compliant types, then surely all .NET based languages can inter-operate. When and how does CLS compliance factor in?

For example, System.UInt16 is .NET-compliant, not CLR-compliant, and equivalent to "ushort" in C#.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I get that one would use .NET compliant types in public interfaces and methods so that .NET languages can play nicely together (for example, "System.String", not C#'s "string").

That is actually not an issue. Using C#'s string will result in exactly the same CIL as using System.String.

When and how does CLS compliance factor in?

Some languages do not support all types, so CLS compliance is required if you want to support the type system that is going to work cleanly in all languages. This means that ushort (System.UInt16) is not guaranteed to be usable by all .NET languages, so you should avoid exposing it in a public type if you want to be CLS compliant.

There are other rules you need to follow for CLS compliance, such as not differentiating members merely by case, as some languages are not case sensitive. The type requirements are merely one of many requirements for full CLS compliance.

The main issue here is that the common .NET languages (such as C#) allow you to use many types, names, and techniques that aren't guaranteed to be available to ALL CLS compliant languages - C# is more flexible than it a language needs to be for CLS compliant. This means that, when you use C# to write code, if you want that code to be usable by all CLS compliant languages, you need to restrict what you expose in public APIs.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, but System.UInt16 is a .Net type, so surely all .Net languages have to support it? –  IanC May 29 '13 at 18:37
    
@IanC Nope - In general, most .NET languages support a lot more than the CLS requirements, but you can write a language that is fully CLS compliant that does not support UInt16. –  Reed Copsey May 29 '13 at 18:40
    
I edited the "ushort" mistake, thanks. –  IanC May 29 '13 at 18:40
    
@IanC Added a paragraph in there that may help explain things. –  Reed Copsey May 29 '13 at 18:42
1  
@IanC ".NET Language" is a bit of a misnomer - it's really a language targetting the "Common Language Runtime" using the "Common Language Specifications" - a language can ADD to the spec (and work with other types), but if it wants to be compliant, it must implement and work with everything in the CLS. This makes it easier to create a language (you don't have to support every languages' peculiarities) that will work on the CLR, but you aren't limited to the CLS if you don't want to be. –  Reed Copsey May 29 '13 at 18:46

CLS compliance is stricter than just the shared types system (meaning the types that all .NET language can use).

One example is naming - in C# you can start a public member name with an _.

This is not CLS compliant, as not all languages allow it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. So this comes down to what languages would use CLS but not .Net types? –  IanC May 29 '13 at 18:38
    
@IanC - Not sure I follow. All .NET languages will use .NET types, but not all of the types are supported by every .NET language. Also, naming is important. –  Oded May 29 '13 at 18:42
    
Well, for example, it seems that System.UInt16 need not be supported by all .Net languages, even though this is a base .Net type. Is this correct? –  IanC May 29 '13 at 18:47
    
@IanC - I believe so. Not all .NET language have unsigned integers. –  Oded May 29 '13 at 19:02
    
Thanks for your help. –  IanC May 29 '13 at 19:06

If one uses .NET compliant types, then surely all .NET based languages can inter-operate.

That's not at all true. Not all languages support all of the .NET types. For example, earlier versions of VB.NET didn't support UInt16, UInt32, or UInt64.

When and how does CLS compliance factor in?

The CLS defines, among other things, the types that languages must implement in order to interoperate. All other types are optional.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.