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I got a try-catch block in my php application like this:

try {
  if ($userForgotToEnterField) {
     throw new Exception('You need to fill in your name!');
  }
  ...
  doDifferentThingsThatCanThrowExceptions();
  ...
} catch (ExpectedException $e) {
  $template->setError('A database error occured.');
} catch (Exception $e) {
  $template->setError($e->getMessage());
}

I would like to only output $e->getMessage() for the exceptions I have manually thrown with a custom error text and not the ones that have been thrown by the other code as these might contain sensitive information or very technical info that the user should not see.

Is it possible to differentiate from a manually thrown exception and a random exception thrown by some method without using a custom exception class?

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I can see no reason why someone would want this, but you can set a global variable at the time you're throwing the exception, to discriminate them –  periklis May 29 '13 at 18:52
    
You can extend the Exceptions class, then catch your custom Exceptions php.net/manual/en/language.exceptions.extending.php –  Ryan Naddy May 29 '13 at 18:53
    
Well, I don't really need custom exception classes in my project. why should I use one then? That creates unneeded complexity. Thanks for the suggestion with the global variable, but that creates even more confusion I think. –  Zulakis May 29 '13 at 18:55
    
But the OP requested without custom Exceptions (if it's possible) –  dudewad May 29 '13 at 18:55
2  
@Zulakis: Adding custom exceptions for this scenario, does not make your code more complicated; it rather simplifies it (especially for other developers that would expect it for one) –  periklis May 29 '13 at 18:57
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2 Answers

I've thought about this a bit and I'd say that what you are doing DOES call for a custom exception class. If you want to get around it (which in the end is going to be more confusing), you would basically create a global (or same-scope) variable that all exceptions can modify, and in your throw block flag it.

$threwCustomException = false;

try {
  if ($userForgotToEnterField) {
     throw new Exception('You need to fill in your name!');
     $threwCustomException = true;
  }
  ...
  doDifferentThingsThatCanThrowExceptions();
  ...
} catch (ExpectedException $e) {
  $template->setError('A database error occured.');
} catch (Exception $e) {
    if($threwCustomException){
        //Whatever custom exception handling you wanted here....
    }
  $template->setError($e->getMessage());
}

That's the best I can think of. However, this is a bad idea, and it's the whole reason you are allowed to create your own exception classes. I know you're not looking for this answer, but since you look like you're trying not to create a TON of extra code, I would just extend Exception to "CustomException" or some other name specific to your project, and throw that for all cases, and handle it that way. Hope that helps.

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class CustomException extends Exception { } thats what I am using at the moment ;-) Feels a bit dumb. –  Zulakis May 29 '13 at 19:02
    
Haha... the me from several years ago hears you there. But if you can see it from the bigger perspective, it makes code easier to understand, because you're handling all exceptions the same way, and future coders (including your future self) don't have to figure out this crazy custom error handling system which really (unless I understand you wrong) doesn't do anything different from this approach. Plus this is just cleaner :) Cheers! –  dudewad May 29 '13 at 19:04
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I agree that it might be best to just write your own exceptions. If for whatever reason you don't want to, you could set a custom error message and a custom error code (the second parameter for the Exception constructor.) Check each thrown Exception if the error code is yours, and display only those:

public Exception::__construct() ([ string $message = "" [,int $code = 0[, Exception $previous = NULL ]]] )

and then use getCode

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