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Since Visual Studio 2010 is slated for release in March of 2010 and HTML 5 is now starting to be used even more widely, I would like to know if Visual Studio will ship with HTML 5 templates, standard controls and support for the more common markup?

A definition for support of HTML 5 would be that any new version of Visual Studio should have similar support for code-completion, validation and markup that is currently supported for HTML 4.01 and XHTML 1.0 and 1.1.

Update From the Visual Web Develolper Team Blog:

HTML 5 intellisense and validation schema for Visual Studio 2008 and Visual Web Developer is for downloading. Follow the instructions posted on the page to install the new scheme. Seems like the Visual Studio Team will be supporting HTML 5 after all.

February 2011 Update from the Visual Web Developer Team Blog

Visual Studio 2010 SP1 finally adds some support for HTML5. "The entire HTML5 specification isn’t supported but most of the new elements and attributes are. That means you get both intellisense and validation for HTML5 with SP1." Read More Here

May 2011 Update from Scott Guthrie's blog

Just this month, Microsoft has pushed out some HTML5 improvements with the ASP.NET MVC 3 Tools Update. While the post seems to be very pro MVC, it's nice to see that Visual Studio 2010 now has default templates and intelisense support for HTML5; along with a nice addition of a jQuery script that will give some backwards support for older browsers.

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What aspects of HTML5 are you hoping for. HTML5 is not complete and is expected to take 10 years to be fully adoptable by its drafters because the spec is so bloated. –  austin cheney Nov 5 '09 at 17:27
    
I belive the easiest to speak about would be the new <!DOCTYPE html> which specifies HTML5, the new sections like 'section', 'nav', 'article' and 'footer'. Along with ' datalist' and 'menu'. I wouldn't expect the new 'audio' or 'video' tags to be supported as there is still much debate on those. –  Chris Nov 5 '09 at 19:05
    
I think he means the stuff that is supported by everyone except IE, which isn't everything, but useful stuff –  Matt Briggs Nov 6 '09 at 17:36
    
Internet Explorer isn't developed by the same team as Visual Studio nor Expression Web, but all three work in the same enviroment, the internet. To keep effective I belive that some parts of HTML 5 can not be ignored. –  Chris Nov 6 '09 at 21:28
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9 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

I think real question is - will Microsoft support HTML5? Multiple places on the internet I found that Microsoft is seriously considering to support HTML5. If that is true, it makes sense to expect VS 2010 to support HTML5.

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Of course they will support it... when it is done. In the mean time support (from everywhere) is likely to be patchy. As someone else already pointed out, HTML5 isn't due to be complete for many years. –  ubiquibacon Aug 10 '10 at 4:03
    
Well according to recent annoucements that HTML5 will be the main technology Microsoft endorses for cross platform we development, it sounds like the answer to the question you raise is YES! Microsoft will support HTML5, and not only that it looks like the latest release candidate for IE9 may have the best standards support for HTML5 so far. –  jpierson Nov 12 '10 at 4:54
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The download from the Web Developer Team blog is for Visual Studio 2008. In order to add schema validation support to Visual Studio 2010 you'll want to make some subtle changes:

Add the schema to your 2010 (10.0) folder rather than to your 9.0 folder (duh): So e.g. change the path in the readme from

C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 9.0\Common7\Packages\schemas\html

to

C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\Common7\Packages\schemas\html

Second, EDIT the registry file that is appropriate for your Windows bit version, again replacing the 9.0 with 10.0 - for instance for my 64 bit windows the file reads as follows:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\VisualStudio\10.0\Packages\{1B437D20-F8FE-11D2-A6AE-00104BCC7269}\Schemas\Schema 23]
"File"="html\\html_5.xsd"
"Friendly Name"="HTML 5"
"URI"="http://schemas.microsoft.com/intellisense/html-5"
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Thanks! This worked wonderful! –  Justin Aug 5 '10 at 19:56
    
This considers the name tag in a field to be an error. It's throwing more errors than the 4.01 validation does. –  Loren Pechtel Apr 5 '11 at 0:52
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@Loren: If you're running SP 2010 it's time to upgrade to SP1 and you get HTML5 validation baked in. –  Oskar Austegard Apr 6 '11 at 15:39
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@Loren - plus, you can always edit the xsd file directly - I just did so to make the type attribute for scripts optional (by removing the use="required" attribute in the schema file) - no more squigglies. –  Oskar Austegard Apr 7 '11 at 21:31
    
the validation schema does not support attributes of type data-* ... is there a way to do that in xsd ? –  VANDERWEYEN Jonathan Mar 17 '12 at 11:26
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Just released today: Web Standards Update for Visual Studio SP1.

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Wow! Nice addition. –  Chris Jun 16 '11 at 20:21
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If anyone is having trouble getting the HTML 5 schema tool to work in Visual Studio 2010, take a look at this blog post I found which is a great help:

raihaniqbal.net - HTML5 Support In Visual Studio 2010

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How can you support something that doesn't exist? Something you can't validate against because there's no accepted spec?

Yes they could build in support for the experimental DTD, but they did that with XML/XSLT/XPath and ended up fragmenting XML support for far too long and were attacked for it from all sides.

Giving that people like Google are now pushing for tags they want just to make supporting Wave easier it's going to be a long time before HTML5 is done, and the "standard" is going to fluctuate and change - so why waste time and resources trying to hit a moving target?

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Strangely enough if you develop against .NET then you're devloping against a moving target already. In just a few years we've gone from .NET 1.0 to .NET 4.0, C# and VB.NET have changed quite a bit and we've cycled through a handful of Visual Studios. Now with the changes in browsers and what not, I do not find it wrong to ask if an enviroment I work in everyday will keep up with the shift in the basic framework I work in. –  Chris Nov 6 '09 at 21:22
    
Yes but those were fixed by the time VS came out. And they are standards MS set. Right now you have something that is a big bun fight, were competitors are trying to push their own agendas, and as soon as MS publish something that's what people use. And if it changes again you're stuck - which is why Google is starting to add "HTML5" for the things they need for Wave –  blowdart Nov 6 '09 at 23:17
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A simple answer is yes. Visual studio has been working on this from long time.

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" How can you support something that doesn't exist? Something you can't validate against because there's no accepted spec?

Yes they could build in support for the experimental DTD, but they did that with XML/XSLT/XPath and ended up fragmenting XML support for far too long and were attacked for it from all sides.

Giving that people like Google are now pushing for tags they want just to make supporting Wave easier it's going to be a long time before HTML5 is done, and the "standard" is going to fluctuate and change - so why waste time and resources trying to hit a moving target? " link text

Oh my god! Are you kidding me??? C++ was used by 1.5 million programmer worldwide before it was standardized. link text In the mid-to-late 90's, 50%+ of all software development was done in C++ before it was standardized in 1998. Even when there was an ANSI C standard, very few compilers actually used that standard without countless ambiguous differences. And don't even get me start on how badly all the browsers have followed the HTML standards! In fact, still today no two browsers work exacly 100% the same because they still can't follow the HTML or CSS standards that exist now.

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This doesn't address the question. –  Nathan Davis Mar 9 '11 at 23:53
    
This user most likely tried to comment on blowdart's answer above (stackoverflow.com/a/1689134/27938) but did not have enough SO swag to do so. –  Oskar Austegard Nov 9 '12 at 20:29
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