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I have a database (MySQL 5.1) that uses a cross reference table (local_ref in the example below) to get an numerical ID for a value. I've introduced another cross reference table (foreign_ref, below) to reference these numerical IDs to an index in another database. Normally that's not a complicated join, however, I have multiple columns that use the keys from the cross referenced table (val1 and val2, below).

E.g.:

mysql> select * from foo;
+-----+------+------+
| id  | val1 | val2 |
+-----+------+------+
| 100 | A    | B    |
| 200 | A    | D    |
| 300 | B    | C    |
+-----+------+------+

mysql> select * from local_ref;
+----+-------+
| id | value |
+----+-------+
|  1 | A     |
|  2 | B     |
|  3 | C     |
|  4 | D     |
|  5 | E     |
+----+-------+

mysql> select * from foreign_ref;
+----------+------------+
| local_id | foreign_id |
+----------+------------+
|        1 |         10 |
|        2 |         20 |
|        3 |         30 |
|        4 |         40 |
+----------+------------+

What I need is the following:

+-----+---------+---------+
| id  | val1_id | val2_id |
+-----+---------+---------+
| 100 | 10      | 20      |
| 200 | 10      | 40      |
| 300 | 20      | 30      |
+-----+---------+---------+

Knowing that the original table isn't normalized as it should be, I've achieved the results the following two ways:

Aliasing both cross-reference tables twice:

SELECT
FOO.id, F_R1.foreign_id, F_R2.foreign_id
FROM FOO 
JOIN
Local_Ref as L_R1 ON (FOO.val1 = L_R1.value)
JOIN
Local_Ref as L_R2 ON (FOO.val2 = L_R2.value)
JOIN
Foreign_Ref as F_R1 ON (L_R1.id = F_R1.local_id)
JOIN
Foreign_Ref as F_R2 ON (L_R2.id = F_R2.local_id)

Joining the cross-reference tables twice and aliasing each join.

SELECT
FOO.id, joint1.foreign_id, joint2.foreign_id
FROM
FOO
JOIN
(
SELECT * FROM Local_Ref JOIN Foreign_Ref ON Local_Ref.id = Foreign_Ref.local_id
) as joint1
ON FOO.val1 = joint1.value
JOIN
(
SELECT * FROM Local_Ref JOIN Foreign_Ref ON Local_Ref.id = Foreign_Ref.local_id
) as joint2
ON FOO.val2 = joint2.value

I feel like both approaches are pretty inefficient and could be improved. Aside from reconstructing the database, are there any more efficient solutions?

share|improve this question
    
Your method is fine. –  Gordon Linoff May 30 '13 at 1:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you cannot restructure the foo table, then another way to get the result would be to unpivot the data in that table.

MySQL does not have an unpivot function but you have use a UNION ALL query.

The basic syntax will be:

select id, 'val1' col, val1 value
from foo
union all
select id, 'val2' col, val2 value
from foo

See Demo

This is going to convert the de-normalized table with multiple columns into multiple rows which is easier to join on. Once the data is in this format, then you can join to the other tables once, instead of twice. Lastly, you can apply an aggregate function with a CASE expression to convert the values into columns:

select f.id,
  max(case when f.col = 'val1' then fr.foreign_id end) val1_id,
  max(case when f.col = 'val2' then fr.foreign_id end) val2_id
from
(
  select id, 'val1' col, val1 value
  from foo
  union all
  select id, 'val2' col, val2 value
  from foo
) f
inner join local_ref l
  on f.value = l.value
inner join foreign_ref fr
  on l.id = fr.local_id
group by f.id

See SQL Fiddle with Demo. This gives a result:

|  ID | VAL1_ID | VAL2_ID |
---------------------------
| 100 |      10 |      20 |
| 200 |      10 |      40 |
| 300 |      20 |      30 |
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the detailed response. I ended up using aliasing for now, but I may end up using this in the future. –  Kyle May 31 '13 at 14:25

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