Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
template< typename ... Args >
class Message {
public:
    Message( Args&& ... args ) {
        mArgs = std::make_tuple( args ...  );
    }

    std::tuple< Args ... > mArgs;
    typedef std::function< void ( Args ... ) > HandlerType;

    void Consume( HandlerType handler ) {
        // handler( mArgs ); 
        // How does one unpack this?
    }
};

// Testing code
Message<int, int> msg(1, 2);

msg.Consume( [] ( int i, int j ) {
    std::cout << i << ',' << j << '\n';
});

I'm attempting a simple message passing API, trying to provide a simple templated interface for messages and arguments. I'm running into an issue when I want to pass the arguments into a function.

I've not used variadic templates too much, and was wondering if there is an elegant solution to my problem.

share|improve this question
    
This might be what you're looking for: stackoverflow.com/questions/687490/… – chris May 29 '13 at 22:11
    
Also stackoverflow.com/questions/7858817/… – jrok May 29 '13 at 22:11
    
I've looked at those and have been contemplating implementing those. Since they were a bit dated I was seeing if there were anything a little more elegant. I guess when you start delving into templates the code has to suffer a little bit. Since C++ templates are compile time evaluated I guess it doesn't hurt too bad. – DubyaDubyaDubyaDot May 29 '13 at 22:14
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here is a simple framework for unpacking a tuple and providing its elements as arguments to a given function:

namespace detail
{
    template<int... Is>
    struct seq { };

    template<int N, int... Is>
    struct gen_seq : gen_seq<N - 1, N - 1, Is...> { };

    template<int... Is>
    struct gen_seq<0, Is...> : seq<Is...> { };

    template<typename F, typename... Ts, int... Is>
    void call_with_tuple(F&& f, std::tuple<Ts...> const& t, seq<Is...>)
    {
        (std::forward<F>(f))(std::get<Is>(t)...);
    }
}

template<typename F, typename... Ts>
void call_with_tuple(F&& f, std::tuple<Ts...> const& t)
{
    detail::call_with_tuple(std::forward<F>(f), t, 
        detail::gen_seq<sizeof...(Ts)>());
}

Inside your Consume() function you could then just do:

call_with_tuple(handler, mArgs);

With some more context:

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

template< typename ... Args >
class Message {
public:
    Message( Args&& ... args ) {
        mArgs = std::make_tuple( args ...  );
    }

    std::tuple< Args ... > mArgs;
    typedef std::function< void ( Args ... ) > HandlerType;

    void Consume( HandlerType handler ) {
        call_with_tuple(handler, mArgs);
//      ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    }
};

And here is a live example.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that'so good, works like a charm. Suddenly I realize I don't know as much about C++ templates as I should. Guess I should read a book or three. It's not too hard on the eyes either. Between yours and mfont's answers, this was such a hard decision for choosing. – DubyaDubyaDubyaDot May 29 '13 at 22:26
    
@DubyaDubyaDubyaDot: OK, glad you found that useful :) – Andy Prowl May 29 '13 at 22:32
    
I'm really not understanding what gen_seq does or how it's being used in this example? You don't even touch it in the first overload of call_with_tuple... – user2030677 May 29 '13 at 22:38
    
@user2030677: I do: call_with_tuple passes a gen_seq object as the third argument to detail::call_with_tuple. That argument is just used for deducing the integer parameter pack Is – Andy Prowl May 29 '13 at 22:39
    
So what does gen_seq actually do (in your implementation thereof)? How is it important to the intent of this program? – user2030677 May 29 '13 at 23:56

How about this?

template<size_t... indexes>
struct index_tuple {};

template<size_t head, size_t... indexes>
struct index_tuple<head, indexes...> {
    typedef typename index_tuple<head-1, head-1, indexes...>::type type;
};

template<size_t... indexes>
struct index_tuple<0, indexes...> {
    typedef index_tuple<indexes...> type;
};

template<typename... Args>
struct index_tuple_maker {
    typedef typename index_tuple<sizeof...(Args)>::type type;
};


template< typename ... Args >
class Message {
public:
    Message( Args&& ... args ) {
        mArgs = std::make_tuple( args ...  );
    }

    std::tuple< Args ... > mArgs;
    typedef std::function< void ( Args ... ) > HandlerType;

    void Consume( const HandlerType &handler ) {
        Consume(handler, typename index_tuple_maker<Args...>::type());
    }
private:
    template<size_t... ns>
    void Consume(const HandlerType &handler, index_tuple<ns...>) {
        handler(std::get<ns>(mArgs)...);
    }
};

Live demo here.

share|improve this answer
    
This is amazingly good, unfortunately I had two great answers at the same time. This was probably the hardest decision for an answer I've ever had to give on StackOverflow. – DubyaDubyaDubyaDot May 29 '13 at 22:25
    
@DubyaDubyaDubyaDot hahaha it's okay man :D. – mfontanini May 29 '13 at 22:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.