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I'm doing my best to code against interfaces whenever possible, but I'm having some issues when it comes to collections. For example, here are a couple interfaces I'd like to use.

public interface IThing {}

public interface IThings : IEnumerable<IThing> {}

Here are the implementations. In order to implement IEnumerable<IThing> I need to explicitly implement IEnumerable<IThing>.GetEnumerator() in Things.

public class Thing : IThing {}

public class Things : List<Thing>, IThings
{
    IEnumerator<IThing> IEnumerable<IThing>.GetEnumerator()
    {
        // This calls itself over and over
        return this.Cast<IThing>().GetEnumerator();
    }
}

The problem is that the GetEnumerator implementation causes a stack overflow. It calls itself over and over again. I can't figure out why it'd decide to call that implementation of GetEnumerator instead of the implementation provided by the result of this.Cast<IThing>(). Any ideas what I'm doing wrong? I'm willing to bet it's something extremely silly...

Here's some simple test code for the above classes:

static void Enumerate(IThings things)
{
    foreach (IThing thing in things)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("You'll never get here.");
    }
}

static void Main()
{
    Things things = new Things();
    things.Add(new Thing());

    Enumerate(things);
}
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6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use this instead:

    public class Things : List<Thing>, IThings
    {
        IEnumerator<IThing> IEnumerable<IThing>.GetEnumerator()
        {
            foreach (Thing t in this)
            {
                yield return t;
            }
        }
    }

Or you could work with containment instead.

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Oooh, good one. That makes it obvious that base.GetEnumerator() should work, if it understood covariance and contravaraince like Frank said. But since it doesn't, this does the trick pretty well! –  Joe Nov 5 '09 at 19:07
    
yea, c# 4 will be great :^p also, I was surprised that "((List<Thing>)this).Cast<IThing>().GetEnumerator();" didnt work either :s –  Stormenet Nov 5 '09 at 19:10
    
After looking at reflector, it's obvious why Cast doesn't work. It basically only casts each of the elements individually if it has to. In this case it sees that "this" is an IEnumerable<IThing>, so it just returns that. It's too smart for its own good. :) –  Joe Nov 5 '09 at 19:23
    
Yea, suspected something like that :) –  Stormenet Nov 5 '09 at 20:20
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IEnumerator<IThing> IEnumerable<IThing>.GetEnumerator()
{
    // This calls itself over and over
    return this.Cast<IThing>().GetEnumerator();
}

It's a recursive call with no break condition, you're going to get a stack overflow, because it's going to very quickly fill up the stack.

You're casting to an interface, which does not do what you think it does. In the end you are just calling this.GetEnumerator(); which is the function you're already in, thus recursing. Perhaps you mean base.GetEnumerator();

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base.GetEnumerator() won't do the trick, because that returns an IEnumerator<Thing>, not an IEnumerator<IThing>. –  Joe Nov 5 '09 at 18:33
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Generally, you would probably want to decouple the implementation of the Things collection from the implementation of the Thing object. The Things class is capable of working with any implementation of IThing, not just the Thing class.

Specifically:

public class Things : List<IThing>, IThings
{
}

In this case, you don't have to override the default implementation of GetEnumerator(), the base implementation is already typed correctly for you. This will avoid the overflow that you're currently experiencing and satisfies the test case you provided.

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Yeah, that's definitely how I'd do it given the choice. My real life example uses CSLA though, which won't let you do that. It'd really look something like "class Things : ReadOnlyListBase<Things, Thing>, IThings" –  Joe Nov 5 '09 at 18:57
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This is a nice example of the need for the language and runtime to understand covariance and contravariance.

In C# 4, you can just use

IEnumerator<IThing> IEnumerable<IThing>.GetEnumerator()
{
    return base.GetEnumerator();
}
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Seems pretty obvious that this.Cast<IThing>() returns an IEnumerable. Or, at least it does without the implementation of Cast.

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Yeah, I guess that's obvious. I'm not sure how that helps though. I need to return an IEnumerator<IThing>, not an IEnumerable. –  Joe Nov 5 '09 at 18:25
    
Guess I wasn't clear... You didn't provide the implementation of Cast, so I can't tell you 100% what the problem is, but I can almost guarantee you that Cast returns an IEnumerable<IThing> (otherwise it does something that causes the stack overflow). Your explicit implementation of the interface means that the method will be called whenever this is cast as an IEnumerable<IThing>. Therefore, if the method call results in a stack overflow, Cast must be casting the current instance to the IE interface, resulting in a never-ending loop. –  Will Nov 6 '09 at 13:45
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I don't know if a question qualifies as an answer but bear with me Im a consultant ;P Why do you wanna implement the GetEnumerator()?

You're deriving from List if you change that to List you get the GetEnumerator for free.

Be aware too that deriving from List is generally a bad idea. you should consider deriving from IEnumerable<()IThings> (as you're already doing which is atm superflurous since List also implements that interface) or if you need the List interface and not only the IEnumerable implement IList and keep a private List object. That way you get full control about the implementation and only expose a design contract (through the implemented interfaces)

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