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As mentioned in the title, I'm looking for something that can give me more performance than atoi. Presently, the fastest way I know is

atoi(mystring.c_str())

Finally, I would prefer a solution that doesn't rely on Boost. Does anybody have good performance tricks for doing this?

Additional Information: int will not exceed 2 billion, it is always positive, the string has no decimal places in it.

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9  
You're going to have a hard time beating atoi. –  Joel May 30 '13 at 1:17
5  
The answer to this question might depend a little on what integer range you allow. Do you want to convert any integer, or is your allowable input more specific? Do you know for sure that mystring contains only an integer with no other characters? Can it be negative? –  paddy May 30 '13 at 1:18
    
I added some additional information, regular sized int, always positive, no decimals in the string. –  user788171 May 30 '13 at 1:22
2  
You're getting good answers, but I always have to wonder - do you actually know atoi all by itself is consuming a healthy percent of your overall time? People often ask questions like this when in fact there's something else that would yield much more speedup, but they don't know how to find such things. –  Mike Dunlavey May 30 '13 at 1:55

7 Answers 7

atoi can be improved upon significantly, given certain assumptions. This was demonstrated powerfully in a presentation by Andrei Alexandrescu at the C++ and Beyond 2012 conference. Hi s replacement used loop unrolling and ALU parallelism to achieve orders of magnitude in perf improvement. I don't have his materials, but this link uses a similar technique: http://tombarta.wordpress.com/2008/04/23/specializing-atoi/

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1  
I think I have also seen that. Is this the presentation you refer to? It's not C++ and Beyond, though. And I think it's mostly about int-to-string rather than reverse. But there is a lot to learn from that anyway. –  jogojapan May 30 '13 at 1:39

I experimented with solutions using lookup tables, but found them fraught with issues, and actually not very fast. The fastest solution turned out to be the least imaginitive:

int fast_atoi( const char * str )
{
    int val = 0;
    while( *str ) {
        val = val*10 + (*str++ - '0');
    }
    return val;
}

Running a benchmark with a million randomly generated strings:

fast_atoi : 0.0097 seconds
atoi      : 0.0414 seconds

To be fair, I also tested this function by forcing the compiler not to inline it. The results were still good:

fast_atoi : 0.0104 seconds
atoi      : 0.0426 seconds

Provided your data conforms to the requirements of the fast_atoi function, that is pretty reasonable performance. The requirements are:

  1. Input string contains only numeric characters, or is empty
  2. Input string represents a number from 0 up to INT_MAX
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This page compares conversion speed between different string->int functions using different compilers. The naive function, which offers no error checking, offers speeds roughly twice as fast as atoi(), according to the results presented.

// Taken from http://tinodidriksen.com/uploads/code/cpp/speed-string-to-int.cpp
int naive(const char *p) {
    int x = 0;
    bool neg = false;
    if (*p == '-') {
        neg = true;
        ++p;
    }
    while (*p >= '0' && *p <= '9') {
        x = (x*10) + (*p - '0');
        ++p;
    }
    if (neg) {
        x = -x;
    }
    return x;
}

it is always positive

Remove the negative checks in the above code for a micro optimization.

If you can guarantee the string will not have anything but numeric characters, you can micro optimize further by changing the loop

while (*p >= '0' && *p <= '9') {

to

while (*p != '\0' ) {

Which leaves you with

unsigned int naive(const char *p) {
    unsigned int x = 0;
    while (*p != '\0') {
        x = (x*10) + (*p - '0');
        ++p;
    }
    return x;
}
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Yet the naive implementation doesn't comply to the Standard: it doesn't discard leading whitespaces. If you don't need the guarantees of the Standard.. –  dyp May 30 '13 at 1:38
    
@DyP: '\0' will break out of the loop... it's < '0'. Anyway, the linked page doesn't list any functions other than this naive loop which are serious candidates to outperform atoi - they're not utilising any efficiencies coming from the insights above re an expectation of valid characters, always being positive, known maximum size, no need for any error checking.... –  Tony D May 30 '13 at 1:51
    
Oops you're right, brain comparison operator broken, sry.. But then you could change it to while(*p != '\0').. –  dyp May 30 '13 at 1:52
2  
+ That is basically the way I do it, although in the loop I tend to write {x *= 10; x += (*p++ - '0');}. It probably compiles to about the same thing. –  Mike Dunlavey May 30 '13 at 2:01
    
(*p++)&15 is probably faster than *p++ - '0' –  johnnycrash May 14 at 15:23

Why not use a stringstream? I'm not sure of its particular overhead, but you could define:

int myInt; 
string myString = "1561";
stringstream ss;
ss(myString);
ss >> myInt;

Of course, you'd need to

#include <stringstream> 
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Here's the entirety of the atoi function in gcc:

long atoi(const char *str)
{
    long num = 0;
    int neg = 0;
    while (isspace(*str)) str++;
    if (*str == '-')
    {
        neg=1;
        str++;
    }
    while (isdigit(*str))
    {
        num = 10*num + (*str - '0');
        str++;
    }
    if (neg)
        num = -num;
    return num;
 }

The whitespace and negative check are superfluous in your case, but also only use nanoseconds.

isdigit is almost certainly inlined, so that's not costing you any time.

I really don't see room for improvement here.

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The only definitive answer is with checking with your compiler, your real data.

Something I'd try (even if it's using memory accesses so it may be slow depending on caching) is

int value = t1[s[n-1]];
if (n > 1) value += t10[s[n-2]]; else return value;
if (n > 2) value += t100[s[n-3]]; else return value;
if (n > 3) value += t1000[s[n-4]]; else return value;
... continuing for how many digits you need to handle ...

if t1, t10 and so on are statically allocated and constant the compiler shouldn't fear any aliasing and the machine code generated should be quite decent.

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Here is mine. Atoi is the fastest I could come up with. I compiled with msvc 2010 so it might be possible to combine both templates. In msvc 2010, when I combined templates it made the case where you provide a cb argument slower.

Atoi handles nearly all the special atoi cases, and is as fast or faster than this:

int val = 0;
while( *str ) 
    val = val*10 + (*str++ - '0');

Here is the code:

#define EQ1(a,a1) (BYTE(a) == BYTE(a1))
#define EQ1(a,a1,a2) (BYTE(a) == BYTE(a1) && EQ1(a,a2))
#define EQ1(a,a1,a2,a3) (BYTE(a) == BYTE(a1) && EQ1(a,a2,a3))

// Atoi is 4x faster than atoi.  There is also an overload that takes a cb argument.
template <typename T> 
T Atoi(LPCSTR sz) {
    T n = 0;
    bool fNeg = false;  // for unsigned T, this is removed by optimizer
    const BYTE* p = (const BYTE*)sz;
    BYTE ch;
    // test for most exceptions in the leading chars.  Most of the time
    // this test is skipped.  Note we skip over leading zeros to avoid the 
    // useless math in the second loop.  We expect leading 0 to be the most 
    // likely case, so we test it first, however the cpu might reorder that.
    for ( ; (ch=*p-'1') >= 9 ; ++p) { // unsigned trick for range compare
      // ignore leading 0's, spaces, and '+'
      if (EQ1(ch, '0'-'1', ' '-'1', '+'-'1'))
        continue;
      // for unsigned T this is removed by optimizer
      if (!((T)-1 > 0) && ch==BYTE('-'-'1')) {
        fNeg = !fNeg;
        continue;
      }
      // atoi ignores these.  Remove this code for a small perf increase.
      if (BYTE(*p-9) > 4)  // \t, \n, 11, 12, \r. unsigned trick for range compare
        break;
    }
    // deal with rest of digits, stop loop on non digit.
    for ( ; (ch=*p-'0') <= 9 ; ++p) // unsigned trick for range compare
      n = n*10 + ch; 
    // for unsigned T, (fNeg) test is removed by optimizer
    return (fNeg) ? -n : n;
}

// you could go with a single template that took a cb argument, but I could not
// get the optimizer to create good code when both the cb and !cb case were combined.
// above code contains the comments.
template <typename T>
T Atoi(LPCSTR sz, BYTE cb) {
    T n = 0;
    bool fNeg = false; 
    const BYTE* p = (const BYTE*)sz;
    const BYTE* p1 = p + cb;
    BYTE ch;
    for ( ; p<p1 && (ch=*p-'1') >= 9 ; ++p) {
      if (EQ1(ch,BYTE('0'-'1'),BYTE(' '-'1'),BYTE('+'-'1')))
        continue;
      if (!((T)-1 > 0) && ch == BYTE('-'-'1')) {
        fNeg = !fNeg;
        continue;
      }
      if (BYTE(*p-9) > 4)  // \t, \n, 11, 12, \r
        break;
    }
    for ( ; p<p1 && (ch=*p-'0') <= 9 ; ++p)
      n = n*10 + ch; 
    return (fNeg) ? -n : n;
}
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