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The problem is to count the elements in a list without using len(list).

My code:

def countFruits(crops):
  count = 0
  for fruit in crops:
    count = count + fruit
  return count

The error was: 'int' and 'str'

These are supposed to be the test cases that should run the program.

crops = ['apple', 'apple', 'orange', 'strawberry', 'banana','strawberry', 'apple']
count = countFruits(crops)
print count
7
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In the first time through your for loop, you're asking Python to add 0 and 'apple'. Python doesn't know how to do this, so it throws an error. Can you do this so you're only adding numbers together? –  Sam Mussmann May 30 '13 at 2:33
    
count = count + 1 or simply count +=1 –  root May 30 '13 at 2:36
1  
count = crops.__len__()?. (unless you think that's cheating :D) –  kampu May 30 '13 at 2:42
    
I think there's the subtle issue of when you're actually counting the crops vs determining the size of the list –  Ryan Haining May 30 '13 at 2:49
1  
@gnibbler The point was to not use len(), so using __len__ instead could be an allowed alternative. –  poke May 30 '13 at 3:01

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this:

def countFruits(crops):
  count = 0
  for fruit in crops:
    count = count + 1
  return count

To calculate the length of the list you simply have to add 1 to the counter for each element found, ignoring the fruit. Alternatively, you can write the line with the addition like this:

count += 1

And because we're not actually using the fruit, we can write the for like this:

for _ in crops:

Making both modifications, here's the final version of the implementation:

def countFruits(crops):
    count = 0
    for _ in crops:
        count += 1
    return count
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You need simple replace wrong expression: count=count+fruit

def countFruits(crops):
  count = 0
  for fruit in crops:
    count += 1
  return count

expression for x in y, get x how object from list y, to get number you can use function enumerate(crops), return object and number. Other way to use:

countFruits = lambda x: x.index(x[-1])+1

but the best way is use len() you can resign name:

countFruits = len
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def count(x):
    return sum(1 for _ in x)

The above is fairly efficient; the comprehension isn't expanded into memory before taking the sum, but accumulated for each element generated. That is to say: sum([1 for _ in x]) would be much worse.

Can't imagine why you don't want to use len()...the only reason I can imagine is if the iterable is a generator and you don't want to eat the elements, in which case just add a counter to the loop (via enumerate makes it clean, but maybe a bit hidden.

for i, item in enumerate(my_generator):
     do_stuff(item)

print 'Did things to {} items'.format(i)
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Using Recursion and the Ternary operator:

def count_elements(list_):
    return 1 + count_elements(list_[1:]) if list_ else 0

print(count_elements(['apple', 'apple', 'orange', 'strawberry']))

Output:

4
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1  
That’s very ineffective as iterable[1:] will continuously create new list objects causing the old ones to be thrown away (not to mention the overhead for recursion itself). Also iterable is the wrong term when you’re using list access (a list is iterable, but an iterable must not be a list). –  poke May 30 '13 at 3:04
    
@poke: I changed iterable to list_. I know that's not effective. Since the OP can't use len, I assume that this is an exercise in order to learn python programming. So I wanted to propose a way that use features that perhaps the OP didn't know about (Recursion...), and that was not already proposed. –  Sam Bruns May 30 '13 at 3:11

As the usage of len() is forbidden, I assume the real meaning of the task you are given is to learn different techniques within python.

a solution using higher order function with reduce(), lambda and list comprehensions — so basically most of the python goodies…

def countFruits(crops):
    return reduce(lambda x, y: x+y, [1 for _ in crops])

crops = ['apple','orange', 'banana'] 
print countFruits(crops)
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def countFruits(crops):
    return max(enumerate(crops, 1))[0]
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