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I'd like to add another folder in which Play looks for Scala template files.

By default, Play finds templates in app/views/. I'd like to have Play look for views in another folder, app/views-site-specific/, too. Is that possible and how do I do it?


Background:

This views-site-specific folder would actually be a symbolic link to a parent directory of the Play app. The Play app is kept in a Git repository, and this parent directory is another Git repo, which stores site specific themes and customizations, symlinked to from inside the Play app repo. In this way, I can avoid storing site specific stuff in the Play application itself. (It should be reused for many different sites, so I don't want any site specific stuff there.)

This is the layout of everything:

site-specific-git-repo/
  |
  +--play-2.1-application-git-repo/
  |    +--conf/
  |    +--public/
  |    +--app/
  |        +--controllers/
  |        +-- ...
  |        +--views/
  |        |   +--"built-in" Scala templates for e.g. admin pages
  |        |   +--themes/  -- bundled with app server, for E2E tests
  |        +--views-site-specific
  |              |
  |              |
  |              |
  +--themes/  <--` (symbolic link)
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Since the views are actually compiled to .class files, can't you just have a dependency on them instead (using sbt)? Or maybe you can take advantage of Git Submodules? –  maba May 31 '13 at 7:23
    
@maba I don't know how a submodule would help? If I place it below the Play-2.1-app repo directory, its version (SHA1) would have to be checked in to the Play-2.1-app repo, and then it would no longer be possible to make site specific customizations. –  KajMagnus May 31 '13 at 9:08
    
@maba I'm not sure but doesn't Play itself via some SBT plugin compile only .scala.html files located inside app/views/ to .class files? Then I first need to tell Play to look for scala.html files outside the app/views/ folder, and compile them, otherwise there won't be any .class files to depend on? –  KajMagnus May 31 '13 at 9:10
    
I could softlink to [a Play project that contains site specific .scala.templates] located in the parent Git repo. That might work? But it feels like overkill to add a whole Play project, with app, conf, public, project directories, just to add some views/ files. –  KajMagnus May 31 '13 at 10:42

2 Answers 2

In Java (Play 2.3) it's possible to add views in any directory and access them by import, for example adding a view file called test.scala.html in the controllers directory, then

import controllers.html.test;
// ...
return ok(test.render());

Importing several view-files from a sub-directory also works (here using controllers/views/)

import controllers.views.html.*;
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In case it's actually not possible (I don't know), I'm using a somewhat complicated workaround:
(You need to read the Background section in the OP for this to be interesting.)

I create two theme folders inside the app/views/ folder, and softlinked one of them to [a themes/ folder in a supposed parent Git repo]. Instead of trying to create another app/views/ folder.

One of these two theme folders is for built-in themes, the other is for site specific themes, like so:

site-specific-git-repo/
  |
  +--play-2.1-application-git-repo/
  |    +--conf/
  |    +--public/
  |    +--app/
  |        +--controllers/
  |        +-- ...
  |        +--views/
  |            +--..."built-in" Scala templates for e.g. admin pages
  |            +--themesbuiltin/
  |            |   +--default20121009  <— bundled with Play app, for E2E tests
  |            +--themes/     <— site specific, don't want in Play app Git repo
  |                |
  |                |
  +--themes/  <----` (symbolic link)

And my Scala code now becomes a little bit more complex: It searches both app/views/themesbuiltin/ and app/views/themes/ for Scala Template files. (Which Scala Template to use is specified in a config file, and at runtime it's found via reflection.)

However also CSS and JS would probably be located sometimes in .../themesbuiltin/[theme-name]/styles.css and sometimes in .../themes/[theme-name]/styles.css, and I have a feeling that this workaround makes the Scala code unnecessarily complex.

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