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I read in this answer to "How website can track users even after clearing browser cookies" that a user can be tracked via the website favicon:

Favicons are a third possibility--which most browsers request before the page is loaded, so if that request is satisfied, then the client is obviously a repeat visitor.

If this is actually possible it can be a good way of checking if the user visited the website before, don't needing to use cookies for that porpouse.

I'm not really sure if this is something that I can accomplish with PHP or Javascript (jQuery). How can this be achieved?

EDIT:

What I interpreted with this is that the user makes a call if he needs the Favicon. If he does not make that call it means he already has the favicon so he visited. So there is no need to store any file (cookie for example) in the user computer or keep its IP in the server. Is this correct?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 14 down vote
+100

There are two things you need to do. First you need to redirect the favicon request to a script. You can do this in two ways. The first would be to add something like the following to your .htaccess file

RewriteEngine on
RewriteRule ^/favicon.ico   /favicon.php  [L]

or you could send another favicon location in the html code. However, I would not use this to directly redirect to the php script as some browsers have issues using the favicon correctly if its not realy a .ico or .png file. Perhaps you can use it to redirect to an alternative favicon.ico location and use it combined with the .htaccess. I used one icon location for all settings, which isnt realy needed. But this way you know how you can alter it.

<link rel="icon" href="/favicon.ico" type="image/x-icon">
<link rel="shortcut icon" href="/favicon.ico" type="image/x-icon">
<link rel="icon" href="/favicon.ico" type="image/x-icon" sizes="32x32">
<link rel="shortcut icon" href="/favicon.ico" type="image/x-icon" sizes="32x32">

Since you are redirecting to a PHP script, you can use the code below to handle the actual request.

<?php
//the location of the actual favicon
$favicon = '/favicon.ico';
$protocol = (isset($_SERVER['SERVER_PROTOCOL'])) ? $_SERVER['SERVER_PROTOCOL'] : 'HTTP/1.0';

//try to get the file info, to be able to get the correct content type
//if it doesnt work, return 404 error
$size = @getimagesize($favicon);
if (!$size) {
  header($protocol . ' 404 Not Found');
  exit();
}

// Content type
header('Content-type: ' . $size[2]);

//when is the icon last modified
//Keep in mind that if you modify the icon, all returning visitors will be handled as new visitors
$last_modified_time = @filemtime($favicon);

header("Accept-Ranges:  bytes");
//set a long max-age with a recheck marker, so people check if the icon is still the same and thus access this script.
header("Cache-Control: max-age=15724800, public, must-revalidate");
header("Vary: Accept-Encoding");
//some say the Etag is bad, some say it isnt. You can remove this part if you dont want to use it.
header("Etag: " . md5($favicon . $last_modified_time));


// exit if not modified
if (array_key_exists('HTTP_IF_MODIFIED_SINCE', $_SERVER)) {
  if (@strtotime($_SERVER['HTTP_IF_MODIFIED_SINCE']) == $last_modified_time) { 
      header($protocol .' 304 Not Modified'); 

      /*
      At this point you have a returning visitor.           
      */
      DoSomethingWithReturningVisitor();

      exit();
  }
}

// exit if not modified using Etag, remove it if you dont want to use it.
if (array_key_exists('HTTP_IF_NONE_MATCH', $_SERVER)) {
  if ($_SERVER['HTTP_IF_NONE_MATCH'] == md5($favicon . $last_modified_time)) { 
      header($protocol.' 304 Not Modified'); 


      /*
      At this point you have a returning visitor.           
      */
      DoSomethingWithReturningVisitor();


      exit();
  }
}

//you are sending a new image to the user. Add the last modified time.
header("Last-Modified: ".gmdate("D, d M Y H:i:s", $last_modified_time)." GMT");


//log that he is a new visitor
//If you dont to this, the user will be marked as returning visitor when he visits the 2nd page of your website
$_SESSION['newVisitor'] = true;

//return the content of the actual image
echo file_get_contents($favicon);


//A single point to handle returning visitors
//make sure you dont have any output in this function, because you are still returning a valid favicon. If you have any output the returned icon will be corrupted.

function DoSomethingWithReturningVisitor() {
  if (!empty($_SESSION['newVisitor']) && $_SESSION['newVisitor'] === true) {
    //already marked as new visitor, so skip for this session
    return;
  }

  //do something to give this user special treatment
  $_SESSION['returningVisitor'] = true;
}
?>

Now on the first request to your webpage, this will be hard to track. Because the request to your homepage will be made first and then afterwards it will try to load the favicon.ico. So the information for new/returning visitor is not directly available in php. The best way to check if its a returning visitor at the top of the homepage would be something like

<?php
if (empty($_SESSION['returningVisitor']) && empty($_SESSION['newVisitor'])) {
   //unknown if user is new or not
} else if (!empty($_SESSION['returningVisitor']) && $_SESSION['returningVisitor']===true) {
   //returning visitor
} else {
   //new visitor
}
?>

If you realy need to know it on the homepage (Or any other page the user request as the first page for this session), you best option would be to make an ajax call when the document is loaded, perhaps even with a short timeout because the favicon.ico request isnt always part of the body.

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I am a bit confused, at the end is it possible to use the favicon to separate first time vistors from repeat vistors? –  Jack Sep 24 '14 at 8:40
    
That was the goal. It's not 100% guaranteed, but it gives you a way to track if a user has visited your site before. It's an alternative to setting a cookie that last after the browser closes, that says "I Have Been Here Before" –  Hugo Delsing Sep 24 '14 at 9:18
    
thanks, and about the concept, does that mean that using the code you are redirecting user to a script to track the user before passing the favicon image? –  Jack Sep 24 '14 at 10:07
1  
The request to favicon.ico is redirect to this script by the webserver, without the user noticing it, and this script will check certain things in the headers to see if the user was their before. In the end it will send the proper headers and the favicon it self. So the user won't even know the favicon did something else. –  Hugo Delsing Sep 24 '14 at 12:12

To get information on favicon requests in Apache, edit your .htaccess file to reroute the favicon requests to a script of your choice. You would then need to log request IP addresses or use cookies to determine if a site visitor has just requested a favicon or not.

EDIT
Remember to return the favicon after handling the request.

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2  
And don't forget to send the real favicon in the response. :) –  Brian Lacy May 30 '13 at 6:08
    
I am a little bit confussed if this is server side or client side. No javascript solution...? –  Alvaro May 30 '13 at 6:38
    
"You would then need to log request IP addresses or use cookies to determine if a site visitor has just requested a favicon or not." The idea here is the same again as my solution. –  Rajiv007 May 30 '13 at 7:15
    
Maybe I'm not getting the concept correctly. What I interpreted with this is that the user makes a call if he needs the Favicon. If he does not make that call it means he already visited. So there is no need to store any file (cookie for example) in the user computer or keep its IP in the server. –  Alvaro May 30 '13 at 11:00
    
Without IP tracking or cookies, you would know that the request for the favicon was from a "fresh" client, but you would not know that any subsequent requests were from the client that just requested the favion. –  Fallexe May 30 '13 at 23:10

I'm not really sure if this is something that I can accomplish with PHP or Javascript (jQuery). How can this be achieved?

You might want to learn about the differences of client-side and server-side programming.

In your case you are looking from a servers perspective, therefore you want to make use of server-side capabilities (and probably programming). So this non-cookie favicon HTTP requests tracking can be achieved with your server on the server-side. Your server knows when the favicon was requested, just log the request and interpret the data.

What I interpreted with this is that the user makes a call if he needs the Favicon. If he does not make that call it means he already has the favicon so he visited.

Exactly, but you should also test this with some scenarios. E.g. a Browser might or might not take HTTP caching into account. So learn about the specification, understand for what it has been made for, implement your interpretation of the data based on these specs and give it a field-test with different browsers and computers.

So there is no need to store any file (cookie for example) in the user computer or keep its IP in the server. Is this correct?

Well, you need to store at least something if you want to interpret it. It must not be a file technically (you can also store into shared memory for example), however, you need to have some data to work with and this normally requires storing it (somewhere).

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When a browser requests anything from your server it sends all of the cookies etc. This is also true for favicon.

To get PHP to "intercept" these requests you need to force Apache (or what ever HTTP server you are using) to treat favicon as a php file.

inside your .htaccess type (again assuming apache)

<FilesMatch "^favicon.ico$"> 
ForceType application/x-httpd-php
SetHandler application/x-httpd-php
</FilesMatch>

now, for the favicon, The server is now expecting a php file, and the client is expecting an icon. So there can be no white space at all outside of the php or the icon will not work. First move your real favicon to real-favicon.ico and then make a new favicon.ico with the following

<?php
//do any processing you wish here, all cookies etc are available if needed 

header('Content-type: image/x-icon');
echo file_get_contents ("real-favicon.ico");

you dont need the last ?> so its probably safer to leave it off as some editors put white space at the bottom which will break the image.

Without this method, you would have to parse the apache logs looking for these and matching IP's.

You still need cookie information, You cant pass / track information without it.

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I've used this method before, and it works well. Also make sure that you do not echo/output anything other then the image otherwise you will have issues. –  daalbert Jun 6 '13 at 21:40

You could use a webserver-based redirect/rewrite to pass the favicon request to a server-side language of your choice. Implementation depends on your flavour of webserver and language. But if you're going to have a script handle this directly, you might as well just do the tracking from the page.

Alternatively you could try and read log-files if you don't need real-time information. If this is they way you go, you might get more reliable results tracking robots.txt instead. Also, depending on your webserver, the log may not contain all the information (timestamp, IP, etc.) you need.

However, I'd strongly advice against using favicons for this. There is no clear set of rules for when a favicon is requested and browsers handle this differently. They may request the favicon without visiting the website (just to update bookmarks) or they may request it at regular intervals. Requesting favicons isn't limited to just browsers either; many webapplications use favicons to display next to a link. All those unexpected hits will likely make statistics very unreliable.

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Thanks for the advice –  Alvaro Jun 11 '13 at 23:51

The answer you referred to does not explain the technique.

The trick with favicons to identify users works by giving a unique favicon url to every user.

In addition the favicon is served with headers that require the browser to re validate it.

When the users browser re validates the favicon, the unique name of it will be passed, and the ip address can be for example banned.

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1  
How can you send a unique url per user, as you need to identify the user with the favicon. Its a little chicken/egg because you need to favicon to know the user, but you need the user to send the unique favicon –  Hugo Delsing Jun 11 '13 at 10:20
    
true, but that can be handled. –  The Surrican Jun 11 '13 at 17:45

Either use "cookie" which is not so great to track for different browsers or use PHP to track the IP address.

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I am interested in the "favicon method" if there is such a method. –  Alvaro May 30 '13 at 6:01
    
The idea is the same "cookie" take similiar or even less space than favicon and you have to determine through javascript only in both cases. So in anyway it serve your main purpose. –  Rajiv007 May 30 '13 at 7:14
1  
He said "without" cookies..... –  pattyd Jun 4 '13 at 23:10
    
@pattyd...read my answer completely. I said you can either use cookie(which is a faster hassle free method) or IP address. Just don't down vote for the sake of it. –  Rajiv007 Jun 5 '13 at 4:43

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