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I'm trying to understand the encoding way, here is my code to encode and decode a string.

Charset utfset = Charset.forName("UTF-8");
CharsetEncoder encoder = utfset.newEncoder();

String text = "java.abcded.tocken";
CharBuffer cb = CharBuffer.wrap(text.toCharArray());
ByteBuffer bb = encoder.encode(cb);
byte[] bytes = bb.array();

CharsetDecoder isodecoder = utfset.newDecoder();

CharBuffer isodcb = isodecoder.decode(bb);
System.out.println(String.valueOf(cb.array()).equals(String.valueOf(isodcb.array())));

CharBuffer isodcb2 = isodecoder.decode(ByteBuffer.wrap(bytes));
System.out.println(String.valueOf(cb.array()).equals(String.valueOf(isodcb2.array())));

When the decode is performed with byteBuffer itself, the strings are equal but, when the decode is performed with bytebuffer.wrap of the byte array from bytebuffer, the strings are not equal. It is appending spaces to the end, is there a reason behind it ?

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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

CharsetEncoder.encode makes no guarantees about the underlying array size, nor that the ByteBuffer will actually be backed by an array. The array backing the buffer is larger than the number of bytes contained in it.

You should see different numbers if you run this code:

CharsetEncoder encoder = StandardCharsets.UTF_8.newEncoder();

String text = "java.abcded.tocken";
CharBuffer cb = CharBuffer.wrap(text.toCharArray());
ByteBuffer bb = encoder.encode(cb);
System.out.println(bb.remaining());
System.out.println(bb.array().length);
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Yes, the capacity exceeds the limit. But this happens only with few texts and with few other texts it just is fine. i.e. limit and capacity are same. Is there any specific pattern or any value which causes capacity of the bytebuffer to exceed the limit ? –  saiganesh May 30 '13 at 10:27
    
It may be a minor defect but the method behaves as documented. I would treat it as an implementation detail and not access the underlying array unless you are going to use the position() and limit() methods to tell you what parts of the array hold the data. –  McDowell May 30 '13 at 10:47
    
hmmm. Makes sense. Thanks. –  saiganesh May 30 '13 at 11:25
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