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Within your organization, is every developer required to lock his workstation when leaving it?

What do you see a risks when workstations are left unlocked, and how do you think such risks are important compared to "over-wire" (network hacking) security risks?

What policies do you think are most efficient to enforce locking the workstations? (The policies might be either something "technical", like a domain group security settings for screen-savers to be locking, or a "social", like applying some penalties to those who do not lock, or encouraging Goating?)

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I think this question is probably best served on ServerFault.com –  Nick Feb 18 '10 at 16:42
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up vote 5 down vote accepted

For me, this has become habit. On a Windows machine, pressing Windows-L is a quick way of locking the machine.

The solution might be social rather than technical. Convince people that they don't want anyone else reading their email or spoofing their accounts when they step away.

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Or sending an email to the entire team, "Pizza on me today!" –  Swati Oct 3 '08 at 19:04
    
@Swati - in my experience encouraging people to play pranks using other workers computers is generally a bad idea –  user123067 Feb 18 '10 at 16:45
    
It's terrible when you add allEmployees@company.com in the prank mail! –  Rulas Feb 18 '10 at 17:41
    
Generally you should be tasteful in your pranks...i.e. when sending the pizza email, it'd normally be just the immediate team... –  Swati Feb 26 '10 at 14:59
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The primary real world risks are your co-workers "goating" you. You can enforce this by setting a group policy to run the screen saver after X minutes, which can lock the computer as well.

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Goating is one of the most popular sports where I work... Google "random burper" to see what I mean, as an example. –  pearcewg Oct 3 '08 at 20:59
    
I generally prefer sending an embarrassing email to a large mailing list "from" the victim. –  swilliams Oct 3 '08 at 21:02
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In my org (government), yes. We deal with sensitive data (medical and SSN). It's instinctual for me: Windows+L every time I walk away.

The policy is both social and technical. On the social side, we're reminded that personal security is important, and everyone is aware of the data with which we are privy. On the technical side, the workstations use a group policy that turns on the screensaver after 2 minutes, with "On resume, password protect" turned on (and unable to be turned off).

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No, but I'm an organization of 1 - the last time I worked in a large organization, we were not required, but encouraged to. If I were in an enviroment with other people, I would probably lock my workstation now when I left it. While certainly people with physical access can add hardware keyloggers, locking it does add an additional level of security. Depending on the type of organization you are, I think the risks are more from internal organizational snooping than over-the-wire attacks.

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I used to work at a very large corp where the workstation required your badge to be inserted inside it to work. You weren't allowed to move in the building (you needed the badge to open the doors anyway) without that badge on you. Taking the badge out of the workstation's smartcard reader logged you out automatically.

Off topic but even neater, the workstations were more like "networkstations" (note that it is not a necessity to use the system I've just described, though) and the badge held your session. Pop it into another workstation in another building and here's your session just as you left it when you pulled the badge on the other computer.

So they basically solved the issue by physically forcing people to log off their workstation, which I think is the best way to enforce any kind of security-critical policy. People forget, it's human nature.

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The only place I have seen where this is truly important is government, defense, and medical facilities. The best way to enforce it is through user policies on Windows and "dot files" on Unix systems where a screensaver and timeout are pre-chosen for you when you log in and you aren't allowed to change them.

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I never lock my workstation.

When my coworker and friend mocked me and theatened to send embarassing emails from my machine, I mocked him back for thinking that locking does ANYTHING when I have physical access to his machine, and I linked him to this url:

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=USB+keylogger

I don't work with any sensitive data my coworkers wouldn't already have equal access to, but I am doubtful of the effectiveness of workstation locking against a determined snoopish coworker.

edit: the reason I don't lock is because I used to, but it kept creating weird instabilities in windows. I reboot only on demand, so I expect my machine to run for months without becoming unstable and locking was getting in the way.

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The issue is how long it takes to get info off your box. A locked box means someone can't come in and copy your disk while you're out for lunch (generally). –  tloach Oct 3 '08 at 18:57
    
Also, the main issue is typically one of network privileges. Sure, physical access means you can get to anything on the disk that is not encrypted, but it helps for naught for accessing your network credentials. –  AviD Oct 5 '08 at 0:31
    
while you are out for lunch it would be easy to plug in a USB key and type svn co e:\. Game over, and it looks to any network monitoring software like you stole all the source code. There are other people in your office than just coworkers - things have been stolen out of a lot of dev offices I have worked at by outsiders. Access is easy to office buildings - all you need is a shirt with your name on it. –  user123067 Feb 18 '10 at 16:58
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Goating can get you fired, so I don't recommend it. However, if that's not the case where you work, it can be effective, even if it's just a broad email that says, "I will always lock my workstation from now on."

At the very least, machines should lock themselves after X minutes of inactivity, and this should be set via group policy.

Security is about raising the bar, making a greater amount of effort necessary to accomplish something bad. Not locking your workstation at all lowers that bar.

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We combine social and technical methods to encourage IT people to lock their PCs: default screen saver/locking settings plus the threat of goating. (The last place I worked actually locked the screen saver settings.)

One thing to keep in mind is that if you have applications (particularly if they are SSO) that track activity, changes, or both, the data you collect may be less valuable if you can't be sure the user recorded in the data is the user who actually made those changes.

Even at a company like ours, where there isn't a lot of company-related sensitive information available to most users, there's certainly potential for someone to acquire NBR data from another employee via an unlocked workstation. How many people save passwords to websites on their computer? Amazon? Fantasy football? (A dangerous goating technique: drop a key player from someone else's roster. It's really only funny if the commish is in on it with you, so the player can be restored ...)

Another thing to consider is that you can't be sure that everyone in your building belongs there. It's much easier to hack into a network if you're actually in the building: of course the vast majority of people in the building are there because they're allowed to be, but you really don't want to be the victimized company when that one guy in a million does get into the building. (It doesn't even have to be an intentionally bad guy: it could be somebody's kid, a friend, a relative ...) Of course the employee who let that person in could also let that person use their computer, but that kind of attack is much more difficult to stop.

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locking your workstation each time you go for a coffee means that you type your password 10 times per day rather than once. And everyone around you can see you type it. And once they have that password they can impersonate you from remote computers which is far more difficult to prove than using your PC in the office with everyone watching. So surely locking your workstation is actually more of a security risk?

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Interesting. Never actually thought of that one before.... –  peSHIr Feb 5 '09 at 10:04
    
if you type slow enough that human eyes (which operate at 20 fps) can follow each character you probably should not be a developer –  user123067 Feb 18 '10 at 16:48
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I'm running Pageant and have my SSH-public key distributed over all the servers here. Whoever sits down on my workstation can basically log into any account everywhere with my keys.

Therefore I always lock my machine, even for a 30s break. (Windows-L is basically the only Windows-key based shortcut I know.)

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I personally think the risk is low, but in my experience most of the time it's not matter of opinion -- it's often a requirement for big corporate or government clients who will actually come in and audit your security. In that case, some kind of technical (group policy) solution would be best because you can actually prove you are complying with the requirement. I would also do it in cases where there is a legal privacy requirement (like medical data and HIPAA.)

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I worked at a place where the people who supplied some of our equipment were from a company in direct competition with us. They were in the building when the equipment required maintenance. An email would go out every now and then saying they would be there, please lock your machine when you're not at it. If a competitor got our source because a developer forgot to lock their machine, the developer would be looking for a new job.

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We are required to at work, and we enforce it ourselves. Mass chats are started professing love for people, emails are sent, backgrounds are changed, etc. Gotta love the first day when it happens to a new hire, everyone is sure to leave a nice note :)

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The place I used to work had a policy on always locking your workstation. They enforced it by setting up a company wide mailing list - if you left your workstation unlocked, your co-workers would send an embarrassing mail to the list from your account, then lock your machine. It was kind of funny, and also kind of annoying, but it generally worked.

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You could start sitting down at people's workstations and loading up [insert anything bad here] right after they walk away. That will work I'm sure.

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In some/most government offices I've visited, that have the possibility of having members of the public walking about they have smartcards that plug into a USB reader on the PC. The card is on a necklace around the user's neck and locks the workstation when it's removed.

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The owner of my company (and a developer), will make a minor change to your code window if you left your computer unlocked, making you go crazy wondering why your code isn't working until you find it.

Have to say, I never keep my computer unlocked after hearing about that prank, I go crazy enough as it is with some of my code.

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You could rig up a simple foolproof way, have a fingerprint reader plugged into the computer programmed for your password, then wear this necklace with a usb receiver, and if you move away from the workstation, the screen saver actively locks it, then when you appear within the range, swipe your finger off the fingerprint reader to unlock the workstation - I think that would be a quite cheap way of doing it, simple, un-intrusive, and clutter free, no forgetting to lock via 'WinKey+L'

Hope this helps, Best regards, Tom.

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Is it important or is it a good habit? Locking your computer is may not be important say in your own house, but if you are at a client's office and walk away then I would say it is important.

As for how to enforce...

After reading Jeff's blog entry on Don't Forget To Lock Your Computer; I like to change co-worker's desktop backgrounds to...


1,238px × 929px

Needless to say, co-workers started locking their computers.

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