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I'm working on my compiler homework and I have the following question:

Consider the following grammar:

lexp -> number : (op lexp-seq)
op -> + | - | *
lexp-seq -> lexp-seq lexp | lexp

This grammar can be thought of as representing simple integer arithmetic expressions in LISP=like prefix form. For example the expression 34-3*42 would be written (- 34 (* 3 42)).

What interpretation should be given to the legal expressions (- 2 3 4) and (- 2)? What about the expression (+ 2) and ( 2)?*


Now, I'm not really sure what they mean by "What should the intrepretation be". For example, do they want a derivation?

The first one seems like it would be simple enough:
(- 2 3 4)
(- 1 4)
(- 3)

And the unary (- 2) and (+ 2) I suppose would be interpreted as negative and explicit positive?

I have no clue what (* 2) would be interpreted as?

The derivation works and is easy enough:

lexp -> (op lexp-seq)
-> (* lexp-seq)
-> (* lexp)
-> (* number)

But is this all they are asking for? Or is it asking how I would interpret what (* 2) means semantically?

Please help me decipher my ambiguous homework problem!

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At least your honest about it being a homework problem. –  sylvanaar Nov 5 '09 at 19:47
    
I would ask for clarification to a course coordinator/TA/whatever your school calls the prof's helpers. They will know what they want more than we will. –  Benoit Nov 5 '09 at 19:55
    
Agreeing with Ben S. I interpreted the question posed the same way you did, but my opinion doesn't really matter, you know? –  David Seiler Nov 5 '09 at 19:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In scheme (I think in lisp too) language (* ....) means "multiply all expressions in braces" so (* 2) means simply 2 And (- 2 3 4) means "2 - 3 - 4" which is -5

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