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My c# service got an internal .net execution error that points to recursion issue (e.g. stack overflow). The problem is that the service is pretty large, so I am having trouble finding where the recursion actually occurs.

Can someone with massive regex mojo hook me up with a search string that would find what I need?

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No stack trace? –  Philip Wallace Nov 5 '09 at 21:20
    
No, the only reason I even know that the app crashed is that there is an entry in the Event Log announcing that an internal .net framework error has occurred and gives the code, which i traced to stack overflow issues. –  AngryHacker Nov 6 '09 at 3:09
    
Did you ever find this problem? If so how? I think most of the people here did not understand that the program crashes with no logging at all except a general stack overflow error in the Service event log. –  Mladen Mihajlovic Jun 12 '13 at 8:29

7 Answers 7

This is an unanswerable question in the general case. Except for the most trivial examples (e.g. a function calling itself directly), there's no way to analyze a program and determine if recursion occurs. You'll just need to start hitting the debugger or other runtime tools.

This is an example of the halting problem.

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1  
Yes - Very true. Debugging services is trickier than normal applications, though, which may be why they're asking. –  Reed Copsey Nov 5 '09 at 19:55
    
I think you are overstating it a bit. In most cases I think some static analysis an find some cycles - this would not be that hard. Would it be exhaustive? No, but I think to make a practical check for this would not be so hard. Using a regex is not going to happen though. –  Tim Nov 5 '09 at 21:25
1  
I think "some cycles" fits with the "most trivial examples" I was trying to get across. But yeah, even then you'd likely need a full parser just to get started. –  Cogwheel Nov 5 '09 at 23:24

A recursion is not easy to find in some situations like:

method1() {
  method2()
}

method2() {
  method1()
}

So a regex probably would not help you to find it unless it's a trivial case.

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1  
Yep. Build a call graph and look for cycles. –  ephemient Nov 5 '09 at 21:30
    
And hope there are no OS callbacks involved in the recursion ;) –  Cogwheel Nov 5 '09 at 23:25

I agree a regexp isn't going to cut it here.

A more direct way would be to get a dump file and look at it to see where the exception was thrown.

Or you could look at a static analysis tool like NDepend to examine the programs flow.

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How about using a profiling tool like RedGate's Ants profiler or dotTrace?

They both offer free trials. Just run the code with the profiler running and it will quickly show you where your time/memory is being spent.

I'd bet that your problem recursive function will stick out quite a bit.

Additionally, what error logging framework are you using? In case the answer is none, consider adopting one. This Question deals with the options. With a good system, you should be able to get the stack trace which, if you're lucky, may give you clues as to where the exception is occurring.

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I have hundreds of installations around US, this is the only instance that is giving me fits. I can't replicate the problem, but I'd like to at least get close to it, by locating the recursion –  AngryHacker Nov 5 '09 at 20:15

Attach to the service in the debugger and debug it properly. You will find this much easier than trying to search the code of any reasonably sized project.

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The easiest way to do this is to get a stack trace of the thing that is crashing. The stack trace will look like this:

Blah
Foo
Baz
Hello
...
Frob
Frob
Frob
Frob
[several hundred more Frobs]
Frob
Frob
...
Frob
Something -- crash!

The "Frob" is the recursive function. :-)

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I'm not encouraging you to spend money on the commercial tools, but you can just check the manual below to see how they do it generally, what factors are taken into account, etc.

http://www.klocwork.com/products/documentation/current/Finding_potential_stack_overflow_errors

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