Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I see I can do something like this:

print STDOUT (split /\./, 'www.stackoverflow.com')[1];

and "stackoverflow" is printed. However, this:

print +(split /\./, 'www.stackoverflow.com')[1];

does the same, and this:

print (split /\./, 'www.stackoverflow.com')[1];

is a syntax error. So what exactly is going on here? I've always understood the unary plus sign to do nothing whatsoever in any context. And if "print FILEHANDLE EXPR" works, I would have imagined that "print EXPR" would always work equally well. Any insights?

share|improve this question
    
Please change the text of the question to actually be a question about what's going on. This makes the question more useful to others. –  darch Nov 5 '09 at 22:09
    
If you have a suggestion, I would be happy to consider it. –  Richard Simões Nov 5 '09 at 22:32
    
This deserves to be in the perlfaq. I thought it was already there. :( –  brian d foy Nov 6 '09 at 18:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You do not have warnings enabled. In the print(...)[1] case, the set of parentheses are regarded as part of the function syntax.

print (...) interpreted as function at C:\Temp\t.pl line 4.

From, perldoc -f print:

Also be careful not to follow the print keyword with a left parenthesis unless you want the corresponding right parenthesis to terminate the arguments to the print—interpose a + or put parentheses around all the arguments.

See also Why aren't newlines being printed in this Perl code?

share|improve this answer
9  
+1 The space in the OP's print ( is throwing him/her off. Whitespace isn't significant, even if it "looks" significant. This isn't Python. –  Chris Lutz Nov 5 '09 at 20:14
3  
This caveat applies to any listop, too! It's just that print is the one you're most likely to leave the parentheses off of, and the one you're most likely to accidentally add parens to the first arg of. –  hobbs Nov 5 '09 at 21:14

perldoc for print includes this nugget:

Also be careful not to follow the print keyword with a left parenthesis unless you want the corresponding right parenthesis to terminate the arguments to the print--interpose a "+" or put parentheses around all the arguments.

print always evaluates its arguments in LIST context.

To say

print (split /\./, 'www.stackoverflow.com')

is ok. But when you say

print (split /\./, 'www.stackoverflow.com')[0]

the parser expects a LIST after it sees the first (, and considers the LIST to be complete when it sees the closing ). The [0] is not interpreted as operating on anything, so you get a syntax error.

print "abc","def";       # prints "abcdef"
print ("abc","def");     # prints "abcdef"
print ("abc"), "def";    # prints "abc"


Other Perl functions that can take a LIST as the first argument behave the same way:

warn ($message),"\n"   # \n not passed to warn, line # info not suppressed

system ("echo"),"x"    # not same as system("echo","x") or system "echo","x"
                       #    or system(("echo"),"x")
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.