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I need to use a static table in my C++ program to lookup combinations.

This is a simple example (my table would be 3-4 times larger):

int TABLE[3][3] = {
           /*2*/ /*4*/ /*8*/ 
    /*2*/   {4,    8,    16},
    /*4*/   {8,    16,   32},
    /*8*/   {16,   32,   64}
};

I like this kind of table since it's very easy to lookup combinations from indexes and also it's easy to see the combinations.

However I do not like the fact that the 'keys' are only defined in comments which seems wrong.

Have anyone defined similar tables in code and are there any general recommendations?

Edit: My table cannot be computed. It's program specific 'settings'.

share|improve this question
    
Out of interest, do the real keys follow some scheme? (In your example, they're consecutive powers of 2). –  Useless May 30 '13 at 9:38
    
See this question stackoverflow.com/q/1112531/96780 and its top voted answer stackoverflow.com/a/1112543/96780. They might be helpful to you. –  Daniel Daranas May 30 '13 at 9:44
    
Yes, my keys are 0,1,2,n so indexing comes naturally. –  monoceres May 30 '13 at 10:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you need the constant look-up time, and don't want to use unordered_map (for example, because you can trivially avoid the hash computation), you could separate the coding from the lookup.

  1. Code the data as a friendly-to-type-and-read structure including metadata:

    struct TableElement {
        int row;
        int col;
        int val;
    } raw_table[] = {
        {2, 2,  4}, {2, 4,  8}, {2, 8, 16},
        {4, 2,  8}, {4, 4, 16}, {4, 8, 32},
        {8, 2, 16}, {8, 4, 32}, {8, 8, 64} };
    

    (you can probably make something more beautiful with a bit of work)

  2. initialize a fast look-up from this (once, at start-up). This could be:

    • a sparse array for no index computation, as in the second half of Joachim's answer,
    • a dense array for better cache behaviour
    • or even that unordered_map with a custom hash function
share|improve this answer
    
Great, I will investigate this approach. Also, I just realized that I'm actually doing double dispatch as the "cells" in my tables will be function pointers. –  monoceres May 30 '13 at 10:41

Since you also tagged your question you can always use a std::unordered_map inside another std::unordered_map:

std::unordered_map<int, std::unordered_map<int, int>> TABLE = {
    { 2, { { 2,  4 }, { 4,  8 }, { 8, 16 } } },
    { 4, { { 2,  8 }, { 4, 16 }, { 8, 32 } } },
    { 8, { { 2, 16 }, { 4, 32 }, { 8, 64 } } }
//    ^      ^   ^
//    |      |   |
//    |      |   value at [row][column]
//    |      |
//    |      column
//    row
};

// ...

std::cout << TABLE[1][5] << '\n';  // Outputs `0`
std::cout << TABLE[4][6] << '\n';  // Outputs `0`
std::cout << TABLE[4][4] << '\n';  // Outputs `16`

In plain C there is no way of having specific values at specific "keys" without padding your arrays:

int TABLE[9][9] = {
    {  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0 },
    {  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0 },
    {  0,  0,  4,  0,  8,  0,  0,  0, 16 },
    {  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0 },
    {  0,  0,  8,  0, 16,  0,  0,  0, 32 },
    {  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0 },
    {  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0 },
    {  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0 },
    {  0,  0, 16,  0, 32,  0,  0,  0, 64 }
};

However you should be careful not to overstep the indexes, as you will then index out of bounds.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks great. I wonder if std::map wouldn't be faster with small tables though, lookups should be as fast as possible :) –  monoceres May 30 '13 at 9:32
    
@monoceres Benchmark time :) –  Joachim Pileborg May 30 '13 at 9:38

If you just hate these comments, the simplest way is definitely macros.

#define _(x)

int TABLE[3][3] = {
          _(2)  _(4)  _(8) 
    _(2)   {4,    8,    16},
    _(4)   {8,    16,   32},
    _(8)   {16,   32,   64}
};

^_^

share|improve this answer
    
That's actually pretty great :D –  monoceres May 30 '13 at 9:38

In comes C++11:

#include <vector>

int main()
{
  using std::vector;
  vector<vector<int>> table = {
       /*2*/ /*4*/ /*8*/ 
       /*2*/   {4,    8,    16},
       /*4*/   {8,    16,   32},
       /*8*/   {16,   32,   64} };
}

For std::array, this will do the trick:

#include <array>

int main()
{
  using std::array;
  array<array<int,3>,3> table = {{
       /*2*/ /*4*/ /*8*/ 
       /*2*/   {4,    8,    16},
       /*4*/   {8,    16,   32},
       /*8*/   {16,   32,   64} }};
}

Also think about not using multidimensional arrays, but instead using a 1D array with indexing tricks.

share|improve this answer
    
Using std::vector or std::array is great, but I'm still left with the row/column definition in comments. –  monoceres May 30 '13 at 9:31

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