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Given the following List:

val l = List(List(1, 2, 3), List(4, 5), List(6, 7, 8))

If I try to transpose it, Scala will throw the following error:

scala> List.transpose(l)
java.util.NoSuchElementException: head of empty list
    at scala.Nil$.head(List.scala:1365)
    at scala.Nil$.head(List.scala:1362)
    at scala.List$$anonfun$transpose$1.apply(List.scala:417)
    at scala.List$$anonfun$transpose$1.apply(List.scala:417)
    at scala.List.map(List.scala:812)
    at scala.List$.transpose(List.scala:417)
    at .<init>(<console>:6)
    at .<clinit>(<console>)
    at RequestResult...

This is because List.transpose assumes equal-length lists and so uses the head method:

def transpose[A](xss: List[List[A]]): List[List[A]] = {
  val buf = new ListBuffer[List[A]]
  var yss = xss
  while (!yss.head.isEmpty) {
    buf += (yss map (_.head))
    yss = (yss map (_.tail))
  }
  buf.toList
}

I would like to get the following:

List(List(1, 4, 6), List(2, 5, 7), List(3, 8))

Is writing my own version of transpose the best way to do this? This is what I came up with:

def myTranspose[A](xss: List[List[A]]): List[List[A]] = {
  val buf = new ListBuffer[List[A]]
  var yss = xss
  while (!yss.head.isEmpty) {
    buf += (yss filter (!_.isEmpty) map (_.head))
    yss = (yss filter (!_.isEmpty) map (_.tail))
  }
  buf.toList
}

Update: I was interested in comparing the speed of the different solutions offered here, so I put together the following little benchmark:

import scala.testing.Benchmark
import scala.collection.mutable.ListBuffer

trait Transpose extends Benchmark {
  def transpose[Int](xss: List[List[Int]]): List[List[Int]] = Nil
  val list: List[List[Int]] = List(List(1,2,3), Nil, List(4,5,99,100), List(6,7,8))
  def run = {
    val l = transpose(list)
    println(l)
    l
  }
}

object PRTranspose extends Transpose {
  override def transpose[Int](xss: List[List[Int]]): List[List[Int]] = {
    val buf = new ListBuffer[List[Int]]
    var yss = xss
    while (!yss.head.isEmpty) {
      buf += (yss filter (!_.isEmpty) map (_.head))
      yss = (yss filter (!_.isEmpty) map (_.tail))
    }
    buf.toList
  }
}

object ACTranspose extends Transpose {
  override def transpose[Int](xss: List[List[Int]]): List[List[Int]] = {
    val b = new ListBuffer[List[Int]]
    var y = xss filter (!_.isEmpty)
    while (!y.isEmpty) {
      b += y map (_.head)
      y = y map (_.tail) filter (!_.isEmpty)
    }
    b.toList
  }
}

object ETranspose extends Transpose {
  override def transpose[Int](xss: List[List[Int]]): List[List[Int]] = xss.filter(!_.isEmpty) match {    
    case Nil => Nil
    case ys: List[List[Int]] => ys.map{ _.head }::transpose(ys.map{ _.tail })
  }
}

My commands were:

scala PFTranspose 5 out.log
scala ACTranspose 5 out.log
scala ETranspose 5 out.log

My results were:

PRTranspose$            10              0               1               1               0
ACTranspose$            9               2               0               0               0
ETranspose$             9               3               2               3               1
share|improve this question
1  
Do you intend to handle the case where the first list (List(1,2,3)) of the input is not the max size of all the lists. E.g. how do you handle input of List(List(1,2,3), List(4,5,99,100), List(6,7,8)) ? –  Mitch Blevins Nov 5 '09 at 23:28
    
FWIW, Scala 2.8 doesn't have this bug. –  Daniel C. Sobral Nov 6 '09 at 1:01
    
But, it does have a bug if the first list isn't at least as great as any other. –  Daniel C. Sobral Nov 6 '09 at 1:02
    
Good question. In my specific case, the order of the contents in the subsequent sublists doesn't matter, so sorting the input list's lists by length works: myTranspose(l.sort((a, b) => a.length > b.length)) –  pr1001 Nov 6 '09 at 1:16
    
Counting on an undocumented idiosyncrasy of the implementation like "it does what I want if the lists are sorted longest to shortest" is not something I recommend. And, that approach is now broken. –  extempore Feb 20 '11 at 8:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

How about this:

    scala> def transpose[A](xs: List[List[A]]): List[List[A]] = xs.filter(_.nonEmpty) match {    
         |     case Nil    =>  Nil
         |     case ys: List[List[A]] => ys.map{ _.head }::transpose(ys.map{ _.tail })
         | }
    warning: there were unchecked warnings; re-run with -unchecked for details
    transpose: [A](xs: List[List[A]])List[List[A]]

    scala> val ls = List(List(1, 2, 3), List(4, 5), List(6, 7, 8))
    ls: List[List[Int]] = List(List(1, 2, 3), List(4, 5), List(6, 7, 8))

    scala> transpose(ls)
    res0: List[List[Int]] = List(List(1, 4, 6), List(2, 5, 7), List(3, 8))

    scala> val xs = List(List(1,2,3), List(4,5,99,100), List(6,7,8))
xs: List[List[Int]] = List(List(1, 2, 3), List(4, 5, 99, 100), List(6, 7, 8))

scala> transpose(xs)
res1: List[List[Int]] = List(List(1, 4, 6), List(2, 5, 7), List(3, 99, 8), List(100))
share|improve this answer
    
I like the pattern matching and recursion! –  pr1001 Nov 6 '09 at 1:53
    
rats. i was looking for that but got muddled up and ran out of time. i prefer it to mine. –  andrew cooke Nov 6 '09 at 9:43

I suspect the reason transpose is not defined on a "non-rectangular" list of lists is because mathematically the transpose operation is well-defined only on "rectangular structures". A desirable property of a transpose operation is that transpose( transpose(x) ) == x. This is not the case in your generalization of the transpose operation on non-rectangular list of lists.

Also, take a look at my post on Transposing arbitrary collection-of-collections in Scala and think about doing it for non-rectangular collections-of-collections. You will end up with mathematically inconsistent definitions, leave alone implementations.

I do agree that idiosyncratic "transpose" operations are often useful, but I also think that they should not be made available in standard libraries because of potential confusion regarding their precise definitions.

share|improve this answer

I don't know of (and can't imagine - isn't this is a bit odd?! [see discussion in comments]) a library function, but I can polish the code a little:

scala> def transpose(x: List[List[Int]]): List[List[Int]] = {
     |   val b = new ListBuffer[List[Int]]
     |   var y = x filter (!_.isEmpty)
     |   while (!y.isEmpty) {
     |     b += y map (_.head)
     |     y = y map (_.tail) filter (!_.isEmpty)
     |   }
     |   b.toList
     | }
share|improve this answer
    
I really like that one. –  Daniel C. Sobral Nov 6 '09 at 1:03
    
I don't think this is odd functionality at all; I have definitely had cause to write functions which did exactly this –  oxbow_lakes Nov 6 '09 at 11:30
    
I think Andrew meant that he's surprised that the standard library doesn't have such a function. –  pr1001 Nov 6 '09 at 18:42
    
No, I really meant it seemed odd, because you seem to be losing some information (you can't reverse it to get what you started with). But I guess I can imagine uses if I try hard enough :) –  andrew cooke Nov 8 '09 at 17:33
    
Oh, I see. I would say it'd be used in similar situations as zip if you have more than 2 lists. In my case, I have a list of lists of sensor readings. Transposing them gives me a list of lists of the readings at common times, which I can then reduce to the minimum, maximum, and average values. –  pr1001 Nov 8 '09 at 17:48

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