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I have a configuration.xml file which I hold all the (yep, you guessed it!).. configuration strings and values and stuff.

One of those values is a string which is an oauth client id, and it has a hyphen..

<string name="server_clientid">5467656-blahblahblah.apps.googleusercontent.com</string>

Now I get the warning message..

Replace "-" with an "en dash" character (–, &#8211;) ?

Ok fair enough, but if I escape with this then the client id is not valid when I fetch it within the app. I can't use & #8211; basically. How do I get around this?

share|improve this question
    
This is warning.. you can use this string.. – Pankaj Kumar May 30 '13 at 10:43
    
What prevents you from parsing the en dash when reading the UUID? – adrianp May 30 '13 at 10:46
1  
duplicate of How to put a "-" in string.xml file. You will get your answer there. – MaciejGórski May 30 '13 at 10:59
up vote 7 down vote accepted

You wrap your values in

<![CDATA[ ]]> 

which stops the parser from parsing the contents. E.g.

<string name="server_clientid"><![CDATA[ 5467656-blahblahblah.apps.googleusercontent.com ]]></string>
share|improve this answer
1  
I'm pretty sure the <![CDATA[ ]]> goes inside the string tag. – Cornholio May 30 '13 at 10:48
1  
@Cornholio You're right, updated – dKen May 30 '13 at 11:02

You can also suppress the lint warning (which is false since the dash is not used in a typographical context):

<resources xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools">

 ...

<string name="server_clientid" tools:ignore="TypographyDashes">5467656-blahblahblah.apps.googleusercontent.com</string>
share|improve this answer
    
Wowww! Great!.. – Favas Kv Nov 30 '14 at 14:07

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