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Why does this program not output 20?

#include<stdio.h>

int main() {
    int a = 1;
    switch (a) {
            int b = 20;
        case 1:
        {
            printf("b is %d\n", b);
            break;
        }
        default:
        {
            printf("b is %d\n", b);
            break;
        }
    }
    return 0;
}
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What does it output? –  Aric TenEyck Nov 5 '09 at 20:38
3  
@Aric - What it outputs won't help. It's not initialized. –  Chris Lutz Nov 5 '09 at 20:40
    
I would suggest you to get a compiler installed. Better install cygwin with developer package and start running the code and you will get answers to all this and will learn faster and better. –  pankajt Nov 5 '09 at 21:11
    
would the behavior change at all if there was no default case? I don't think so. –  devin Nov 5 '09 at 21:16
    
I'm actually surprised that it works at all, since the declaration gets ignored by the switch... although I guess that scope wise it's fair... just bad form. –  Brian Postow Nov 5 '09 at 21:28

9 Answers 9

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Because the switch statement jumps to a relevant case, so the line int b = 20 will never be executed.

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3  
wow this guy went from like 21 reputation to 201 lol –  Earlz Nov 5 '09 at 20:51
3  
Congrats on hitting the rep cap on your first day here, Rasmus. –  Chris Lutz Nov 5 '09 at 21:23
    
Thanks, Chris, and all who "upped"! :-) –  Rasmus Kaj Nov 5 '09 at 23:07

Your compiler should warn you about this. The initialization of 'b' is at the beginning of the switch statement, where it will never be executed -- execution will always flow directly from the switch statement header to the matching case label.

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1  
Agreed. If it doesn't, add the -Wall flag. If it still doesn't read the compiler manual for the correct flag to enable warnings or get a better compiler (for example gcc). –  Rasmus Kaj Nov 5 '09 at 20:44
    
yes, compiling with -Wall all the time is a very good habit. –  devin Nov 5 '09 at 21:14

It doesn't output "b = 20" because b is set inside the switch statement and this instruction is never executed. What you want is this:

int b = 20;
switch (a) {
    case 1:
    {
        printf("b is %d\n", b);
        break;
    }
    default:
    {
        printf("b is %d\n", b);
        break;
    }
}
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Gcc throws a warning saying that b is uninitialized when you call the printf()

you have to move "int b = 20" before the switch()

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Inside of a switch is a hidden goto statement. So basically what is happening is really

int a=1;
if(a==1){ //case 1
  goto case1;
}else{ //default
  goto default;
}
int b=20;
case1:....
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Inside of an "else" is a hidden goto statement, so basically what is happening is really... ;-) –  Steve Jessop Nov 5 '09 at 22:16
1  
Well I could have dropped to assembly and just did cmp [a],1; je case1 but I figured that was overkill –  Earlz Nov 5 '09 at 22:25

The code

int b = 20

is actually doing two things:

int b

and

b = 20

The compiler sets up a variable called b when it compiles the program. This is an automatic variable, which goes on the stack. But it does not assign it a value until the program execution reaches that point.

Before that point, it is unknown what value the variable has.

This would not be true for a global variable, or a static variable -- those are initialized when the program begins running.

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how is this relevant? the problem is obviously the initialization is never reached because of it's placement in the switch –  Earlz Nov 5 '09 at 20:54
3  
To be fair, he surely just wanted to just say that "b" is still in scope (since it's a compile time thing), which he seem to say is the "int b" part, but just the assignment is not done. So, in other words, the line is not completely ignored. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 5 '09 at 21:00
    
The bottom line is, declaring a variable and initializing that variable happen at different times, even though the same line of code does both. –  Kevin Panko Nov 5 '09 at 21:04
    
Aren't statics with block scope initialised the first time their definition is executed? Or is that only in C++? –  Steve Jessop Nov 5 '09 at 22:21
    
In the above code, if "b" is made static, then the output is indeed 20. If you give it to a C++ compiler, it refuses to compile. –  Kevin Panko Nov 6 '09 at 2:05

Remember that case labels in switch statement are called "labels" for a reason: they are pretty much ordinary labels, just like the ones you can goto to. This is actually how switch works: it is just a structured version of goto that just jumps from switch to the appropriate label and continues execution from there. In your code you always jump over initialization of b. So, b never gets initialized.

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Compiling with gcc (Using cygwin on Windows) gives a warning message -

warning: unreachable code at beginning of switch statement

and the output is undefined or garbage which clearly says that initialization portion of b is never executed and hence the undefined value.

Note: Question can be raised that if the code or line is unreachable, then why does not we get the error: 'b' undeclared.

The compiler checks for the syntax of the program (above checks if b is declared) and finds it correct (b is declared), although semantically/logically it is incorrect.

Probably in future the compilers may become even more smarter and will be able to detect these kind of errors

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@Devil Jin thanks. nice points there. –  Moeb Nov 6 '09 at 17:21

The line

int b=20;

Is not executed before the switch is entered. You would have to move it above the switch statement to get 20 output.

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