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I am wondering an easy way to resolve the {myParameterX} by its value in a string.

I have a section in my xml (obviously simplified for the post) that holds the parameters definitions and a set of string to "translate":

<section>
    <parameters>
        <myParameter1>One</myParameter1>
        <myParameter2>Two</myParameter2>
    </parameters>
    <field toTranslate="{myParameter1} + {myParameter1} = {myParameter2}"/>
    <field toTranslate="{myParameter2} - {myParameter1} = {myParameter1}"/>
</section>

In the end I expect something like:

<field translated="One + One = Two"/>
<field translated="Two - One = One"/>

I think the solution is near but I keep getting nasty error about invalid charachters in my regex (Unexpected token ")" in path expression). I have tried to escape and escape the escape characters but I can't get it :(

<xsl:template name="resolve">
    <xsl:param name="toResolve" as="xs:string"/>
    <xsl:param name="parameters" as="element()"/>

    <xsl:analyze-string regex="{(.+)}" select="$toResolve">
        <xsl:matching-substring>
            <xsl:variable name="pName" select="regex-group(1)"/>
            <xsl:value-of select="$parameters/$pName"/>
        </xsl:matching-substring>
    </xsl:analyze-string>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:call-template name="resolve">
    <xsl:with-param name="toResolve" select="field/@toTranslate"/>
    <xsl:with-param name="parameters" select="parameters"/>
</xsl:call-template>

Note, I am using xslt 2.0 Any idea?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try <xsl:analyze-string regex="\{{(.+?)\}}" select="$toResolve">.

Here is a complete sample:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

<xsl:template match="@* | node()">
  <xsl:copy>
    <xsl:apply-templates select="@* , node()"/>
  </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="field/@toTranslate">
  <xsl:variable name="field" select=".."/>
  <xsl:attribute name="translated">
    <xsl:analyze-string regex="\{{(.+?)\}}" select=".">
        <xsl:matching-substring>
            <xsl:variable name="pName" select="regex-group(1)"/>
            <xsl:value-of select="$field/../parameters/*[local-name() eq $pName]"/>
        </xsl:matching-substring>
        <xsl:non-matching-substring>
           <xsl:value-of select="."/>
        </xsl:non-matching-substring>
    </xsl:analyze-string>
  </xsl:attribute>
</xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

Transforms

<section>
    <parameters>
        <myParameter1>One</myParameter1>
        <myParameter2>Two</myParameter2>
    </parameters>
    <field toTranslate="{myParameter1} + {myParameter1} = {myParameter2}"/>
    <field toTranslate="{myParameter2} - {myParameter1} = {myParameter1}"/>
</section>

into

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?><section>
    <parameters>
        <myParameter1>One</myParameter1>
        <myParameter2>Two</myParameter2>
    </parameters>
    <field translated="One + One = Two"/>
    <field translated="Two - One = One"/>
</section>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Where can I find the way to escape properly the regex in xsl? –  ZNK - M May 30 '13 at 12:18
    
Are you asking for a documentation? Or a function to escape? There are two problems, the regex attribute allows attribute value templates (XSLT syntax) so curly braces { and } need to be duplicated to be interpreted literally, and inside a regular expression pattern the curly braces are used to delimit a quantifier (e.g. a{5,10} matches 5 to 10 a characters) so for the regular expression to treat the braces literally we need \{ respectively ``}. Together that results in regex="\{{(.+?)\}}"`. –  Martin Honnen May 30 '13 at 12:32
    
As for a function that would escape the { as \{, see xsltfunctions.com/xsl/functx_escape-for-regex.html. –  Martin Honnen May 30 '13 at 12:34
    
ok, thanks, I was missing the first bit of your explanation (duplicate the curly braces). thx –  ZNK - M May 30 '13 at 12:36

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