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I am parsing CSV files to lists of objects with strongly-typed properties. This involves parsing each string value from the file to an IConvertible type (int, decimal, double, DateTime, etc) using TypeDescriptor.

I am using a try catch to handle situations when parsing fails. The exact details of where and why this exception occurs is then logged for further investigation. Below is the actually parsing code:

try
{
    parsedValue = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(type).ConvertFromString(dataValue);
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    // Log failure
}

Problem:

When values are successfully parsed, the process is quick. When parsing data with lots of invalid data, the process can take thousands of times slower (due to catching the exception).

I've been testing this with parsing to DateTime. These are the performance figures:

  • Successful parsing: average of 32 ticks per parse
  • Failed parsing: average of 146296 ticks per parse

That's more than 4500 times slower.

Question:

Is it possible for me to check to see if a string value can be successfully parsed without having to use my expensive try catch method? Or perhaps there is another way I should be doing this?

EDIT: I need to use TypeDescriptor (and not DateTime.TryParse) because the type is determined at runtime.

share|improve this question
    
If you know the type, you could try manually hitting each one's various TryParse methods and see if that helps. – Chris Sinclair May 30 '13 at 12:11
1  
Are you trying to hit every type parser in order to see which one is compatible for the CSV entry? That is, first you try DateTime, then you try int, then you try decimal, then you try double, then catch-all to string? Or do you know that a certain entry should be DateTime, but sometimes/often the data itself is in an incorrect format? – Chris Sinclair May 30 '13 at 12:16
    
Also, are you performing this benchmarking in release mode or debug mode, or with the debugger attached? If in debug mode, it may be reporting/storing excessive exception/stack information for debugging purposes. – Chris Sinclair May 30 '13 at 12:19
1  
It might be a bit faster, especially if you are throwing a lot of exceptions. Do you have a fixed number of supported types? Like you only support DateTime, int, double, decimal, string, and some others? Or is the list of supported types unknown at compile-time? – Chris Sinclair May 30 '13 at 12:24
2  
It should be quite a lot (magnitudes, possibly) faster if you run it without the debugger attached (i.e. Ctrl+F5). The debugger does lots of stuff when an exception is thrown. – Jim Mischel May 30 '13 at 13:19
up vote 11 down vote accepted

If you have a known set of types to convert, you can do a series of if/elseif/elseif/else (or switch/case on the type name) to essentially distribute it to specialized parsing methods. This should be pretty fast. This is as described in @Fabio's answer.

If you still have performance issues, you can also create a lookup table which will let you add new parsing methods as you need to support them:

Given some basic parsing wrappers:

public delegate bool TryParseMethod<T>(string input, out T value);

public interface ITryParser
{
    bool TryParse(string input, out object value);
}

public class TryParser<T> : ITryParser
{
    private TryParseMethod<T> ParsingMethod;

    public TryParser(TryParseMethod<T> parsingMethod)
    {
        this.ParsingMethod = parsingMethod;
    }

    public bool TryParse(string input, out object value)
    {
        T parsedOutput;
        bool success = ParsingMethod(input, out parsedOutput);
        value = parsedOutput;
        return success;
    }
}

You can then setup a conversion helper which does the lookup and calls the appropriate parser:

public static class DataConversion
{
    private static Dictionary<Type, ITryParser> Parsers;

    static DataConversion()
    {
        Parsers = new Dictionary<Type, ITryParser>();
        AddParser<DateTime>(DateTime.TryParse);
        AddParser<int>(Int32.TryParse);
        AddParser<double>(Double.TryParse);
        AddParser<decimal>(Decimal.TryParse);
        AddParser<string>((string input, out string value) => {value = input; return true;});
    }

    public static void AddParser<T>(TryParseMethod<T> parseMethod)
    {
        Parsers.Add(typeof(T), new TryParser<T>(parseMethod));
    }

    public static bool Convert<T>(string input, out T value)
    {
        object parseResult;
        bool success = Convert(typeof(T), input, out parseResult);
        if (success)
            value = (T)parseResult;
        else
            value = default(T);
        return success;
    }

    public static bool Convert(Type type, string input, out object value)
    {
        ITryParser parser;
        if (Parsers.TryGetValue(type, out parser))
            return parser.TryParse(input, out value);
        else
            throw new NotSupportedException(String.Format("The specified type \"{0}\" is not supported.", type.FullName));
    }
}

Then usage might be like:

//for a known type at compile time
int value;
if (!DataConversion.Convert<int>("3", out value))
{
    //log failure
}

//or for unknown type at compile time:
object value;
if (!DataConversion.Convert(myType, dataValue, out value))
{
    //log failure
}

This could probably have the generics expanded on to avoid object boxing and type casting, but as it stands this works fine; perhaps only optimize that aspect if you have a measurable performance from it.

EDIT: You can update the DataConversion.Convert method so that if it doesn't have the specified converter registered, it can fall-back to your TypeConverter method or throw an appropriate exception. It's up to you if you want to have a catch-all or simply have your predefined set of supported types and avoid having your try/catch all over again. As it stands, the code has been updated to throw a NotSupportedException with a message indicating the unsupported type. Feel free to tweak as it makes sense. Performance wise, maybe it makes sense to do the catch-all as perhaps those will be fewer and far between once you specify specialized parsers for the most commonly used types.

share|improve this answer
2  
Good, but you should use Parsers.TryGetValue and fallback to the TypeConverter and exception-handling for unanticipated types. – Ben Voigt May 30 '13 at 12:58
1  
@BenVoigt Funny, I was just adding that. I started doing the TypeConverter method but I figured that would be missing the point of this. davenewza specified that he has a fixed number of types and wanted to avoid the try/catch exception handling in the first place. – Chris Sinclair May 30 '13 at 13:02
    
Excellent solution Chris. I completely forgot that I also need to cater for Nullable types. Would it be possible with your solution... Nullable<int> perhaps? I will attempt this now myself. – davenewza May 30 '13 at 13:20
    
I have implemented my own static TryParse methods for Nullable types as per your TryParserMethod delegate. Works perfectly and it is VERY fast. – davenewza May 30 '13 at 13:35
1  
@davenewza Glad it worked out for you. It should be very flexible. You can feed it your own delegates for custom types or even implement your own ITryParser classes if you have very complicated logic or even wanted to expand on some of the primitive type conversions (e.g., support "true/false", "1/0", "Yes/No" for booleans). EDIT: You can even expand on the ITryParser definition to support say, custom error messages or reasons that you can't parse it. – Chris Sinclair May 30 '13 at 14:31

If you know a type where you trying to parse, then use TryParse method:

String value;
Int32 parsedValue;
if (Int32.TryParse(value, parsedValue) == True)
    // actions if parsed ok
else
    // actions if not parsed

Same for other types

Decimal.TryParse(value, parsedValue)
Double.TryParse(value, parsedValue)
DateTime.TryParse(value, parsedValue)

Or you can use next workaround:

Create a parse methods for every type with same name, but different signature(wrap TryParse inside of them):

Private bool TryParsing(String value, out Int32 parsedValue)
{
    Return Int32.TryParse(value, parsedValue)
}

Private bool TryParsing(String value, out Double parsedValue)
{
    Return Double.TryParse(value, parsedValue)
}

Private bool TryParsing(String value, out Decimal parsedValue)
{
    Return Decimal.TryParse(value, parsedValue)
}

Private bool TryParsing(String value, out DateTime parsedValue)
{
    Return DateTime.TryParse(value, parsedValue)
}

Then you can use method TryParsing with your types

share|improve this answer
1  
So would you recommend that I perform type checking and then run the relevant TryParse method? – davenewza May 30 '13 at 12:20
1  
@davenewza Yes, if you have a fixed number of supported types. If necessary, you can move the "type checking" to say a lookup table keyed by Type and its value is some kind of parser or delegate. – Chris Sinclair May 30 '13 at 12:29
    
There is only one Type object for each unique type, so you can compare them with ReferenceEquals, which is comparing object references, which should be very fast compared to catching exceptions. – Dark Falcon May 30 '13 at 12:30
1  
+1, but good-god.. VB :( – Moo-Juice May 30 '13 at 12:50
1  
@Moo-Juice, sorry was writing first VB.NET code, then after trying to change to C# :) - updated... – Fabio May 30 '13 at 18:26

How about constructing a regular expression for each type and applying it to the string before calling Parse? You'd have to build the regular expression such that if the string doesn't match, it wouldn't parse. This would be a little slower if the string parses since you'd have to do the regex test, but it would be way faster if it doesn't parse.

You could put the regex strings in a Dictionary<Type, string>, which would make determining which regex string to use simple.

share|improve this answer
    
That is a good idea. The only problem is that this needs to be culture-sensitive. So, depending on the culture settings, it would parse differently. Decimal points, for example, could be a point or a comma. – davenewza May 30 '13 at 12:51
    
Then you'd have to write logic to build the regex strings using the current culture settings. Everything you need is in that object. At least it's something you'd only have to do at initialization time and maybe if the culture settings change. – Tony Vitabile May 30 '13 at 12:53
    
You'd have to build the regular expression such that if the string doesn't match, it wouldn't parse. That's a lot harder than it sounds. The Regex to parse valid byte values is surprisingly involved. If you insist on using Regex, you're better off using them to pre-filter the obviously bad stuff, but still handle exceptions that might arise with Parse. – Jim Mischel May 30 '13 at 13:24
    
@JimMischel: Agreed, the exception handling is required if you're going to use Parse. – Tony Vitabile May 30 '13 at 13:27

You could use the TryParse method :

if (DateTime.TryParse(input, out dateTime))
{
    Console.WriteLine(dateTime);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I need to be able to parse to any type, hence why I need to use TypeDescriptor. Edited post! – davenewza May 30 '13 at 12:14
    
what if you covert your object to string first with toString() and than use that :), Keep us posted about your findings so we can learn the fastest way to parse :) – Apocalyp5e May 30 '13 at 12:17

It depends. If you're using a DateTime, you can always use the TryParse function. This will be a magnitude faster.

share|improve this answer
    
I need to be able to parse to any type, hence why I need to use TypeDescriptor. Edited post! – davenewza May 30 '13 at 12:14
    
you could use TryParse methods for known types, and call TypeDescritor for other ones. – stefano m May 30 '13 at 12:43

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