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I am trying to understand why the following code does not compile, apparently the solution relies in specifically declaring the dependency on method_A in the derived class. Please refer to the following code:

class Base
{
  public:

    void method_A(int param, int param2)
    {
      std::cout << "Base call A" << std::endl;
    }

};

//does not compile
class Derived : public Base
{
  public:

    void method_A(int param)
    {
      std::cout << "Derived call A" << std::endl;
    }
};

//compiles
class Derived2 : public Base
{
  public:
    using Base::method_A; //compile
    void method_A(int param)
    {
      std::cout << "Derived call A" << std::endl;
    }
};

int main ()
{
  Derived myDerived;
  myDerived.method_A(1);
  myDerived.method_A(1,2);

  Derived2 myDerived2;
  myDerived2.method_A(1);
  myDerived2.method_A(1,2);
  return 0;
}

"test.cpp", (S) The wrong number of arguments have been specified for "Derived::method_A(int)".

What is the technical reason that prevents the derived class to know its base class is implementing the method it's trying to overload? I am looking in understanding better how the compiler/linker behaves in this case.

share|improve this question
    
Are you missing virtual? –  Majster May 30 '13 at 12:18
    
no, my intention is to overload the function. I f we did not have object inheritance it would be like: void method_A(int param, int param2); void method_A(int param); –  dau_sama May 30 '13 at 12:23

5 Answers 5

Its called Name Hiding. When you define a non virtual method with the same name as Base method it hides the Base class method in Derived class so you are getting the error for

 myDerived.method_A(1,2);

To avoid hiding of Base class methods in Derived class use using keyword as you did in Derived2 class.

Also if you want to make it work you can do it explictly

myDerived.Base::method_A(1,2);

Check out this for better explanation why name hiding came into picture.

share|improve this answer

Well, for one you're calling

 myDerived.method_A(1,2);

with 2 arguments, whereas both in base and derived the method is declared to take only one argument.

Secodnly, you're not overriding anything, because method_A is not virtual. You're overloading.

share|improve this answer
    
myDerived.method_A(1,2); should call the base class method. I agree, I wanted to say overload –  dau_sama May 30 '13 at 12:25

If your intention is to override void Base::method_A(int param, int param2) then you should mark it virtual in the base class:

 virtual void method_A(int param, int param2)

Any function overriding this must have the same parameters and almost the same return type ('almost' loosely meaning that the differing return types must be polymorphically related, but in most cases it should have the identical return type).

All you're currently doing is overloading the function in the base class. The using keyword is bringing the base class function into the child class' namespace, as the language behaviour is not to do this by default.

share|improve this answer
    
as said in other comments, I actually did want to overload –  dau_sama May 30 '13 at 12:28

http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/comphelp/v8v101/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.ibm.xlcpp8a.doc%2Flanguage%2Fref%2Foverload_member_fn_base_derived.htm

The above link should answer your question.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, it's exactly the behavior I explained. I am looking at "why" the base method is hidden, why it has been decided like that at language level? –  dau_sama May 30 '13 at 12:41
    
To try to avoid the brittle base class problem. –  Raymond Chen May 30 '13 at 13:08
    
link only answers should be elaborated or left as a comment. an answer should answer the question, not provide an external link to the question. –  John Dibling May 30 '13 at 13:35

In your Derived classes, you forgot one argument for method_A(), it was declared like this in Base:

void method_A(int param, int param2);

and like this in the other classes:

void method_A(int param);

(And virtual as others said.)

share|improve this answer
    
it is exactly what I wanted to do, I wanted to overload the base class method. –  dau_sama May 30 '13 at 12:26
    
Well it must have the same prototype then, otherwise it's not the same method. –  Djon May 30 '13 at 12:31

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