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I want to do something like this:

public List<T> GetList<T>()
{
    if (typeof(T) == typeof(Type1))
    {
        return new List<Type1>() { new Type1(), new Type1(), new Type1() };
    }

    if (typeof(T) == typeof(Type2))
    {
        return new List<Type2>() {new Type2(), new Type2()};
    }

    throw new Exception("Unknown T");
}

public void DoStuffWithGenericList<T>()
{
    var list = GetList<T>();
    // do stuff that does not depend on T
}

But that, of course, is not legal. I feel I am missing something basic here :)

In my case, I am getting lists of different types of objects from Entity Framework, but the rest of my logic does not depend on the actual type. It can just work on List or it could be generic.

All Ts that GetList() will be called with as type parameter will inherit from the same base class, if it makes a difference.

share|improve this question
    
Does Type1 and Type2 are related ? Can both be derived from the same Parent class? –  mathk May 30 '13 at 12:25
    
If you are looking for a really generic solution that creates new instances of T without putting constraints on them, and still is relatively fast, you could use compiled lambdas or IL. –  Daniel May 30 '13 at 12:29

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted
public List<T> GetList<T>() 
{
    if (typeof(T) == typeof(Type1))
    {
        return new List<Type1>() { new Type1(), new Type1(), new Type1() }.Cast<T>().ToList();
    }

    if (typeof(T) == typeof(Type2))
    {
        return new List<Type2>() {new Type2(), new Type2()}.Cast<T>().ToList();
    }

    throw new Exception("Unknown T");
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is my favorite solution but I would also add a where T : Type1, Type2 clause to the method definition to ensure most errors are detected at compile time. –  MarcF May 30 '13 at 12:28
1  
@MarcF the type constraint list can include at most one class (and any number of interfaces) –  AakashM May 30 '13 at 13:41
    
@AakashM - Good clarification, so it needs to be where T : IType1, IType2. –  MarcF May 30 '13 at 14:02
    
@MarcF That makes no sense - think about what you're saying. –  Paul Bellora May 30 '13 at 19:03

Why not use the 'new' operator to instantiate the types:

public List<T> GetList<T>() where T : new()
{
    if (typeof(T) == typeof(Type1)) 
    { 
        return new List<T>() { new T() }; 
    }                     
    // etc...
    throw new Exception("Unknown T");
}

All you have to do is ensure your types can be instantiated by adding the new() constraint.

share|improve this answer
    
based on type there is a different amount of items in list –  Ilya Ivanov May 30 '13 at 12:26
    
well then you can still differentiate by checking type, but use the new operator. –  L-Three May 30 '13 at 12:27
    
Or take an int argument for the size of the list. –  Paul Bellora May 30 '13 at 19:02

Code like this cannot work because it depends on runtime type checks (you have written them explicitly). But how can the compiler know at compile time that the result of your runtime checks will be something that is actually a List<T>?

In this specific example case, you could achieve the desired aim with

public List<T> GetList<T>() where T : new()
{
    if (typeof(T) == typeof(Type1))
    {
        return new List<T>() { new T(), new T(), new T() };
    }

    if (typeof(T) == typeof(Type2))
    {
        return new List<T>() { new T(), new T() };
    }

    throw new Exception("Unknown T");
}

But of course this does not solve any practical problem. If you have any specific question other than "why does this not work" in mind, you should edit the question to present it.

Consider this: to use GetList at some point in your code you will need to write

var x = GetList<SomeType>();

The type parameter SomeType must be hardcoded at the call site, otherwise the program will not compile. But if it must be hardcoded, then the above is not at all different from

public List<SomeType> GetListOfSomeType() 
{
    return new List<SomeType>();
}

var x = GetListOfSomeType();

So what are you trying to accomplish exactly?

Of course this counter-example is somewhat superficial, and in reality the generic version of GetList would allow increased flexibility if you are willing to use reflection. But again, in your example that is not the case.

share|improve this answer

Just cast the return value since you already checked to make sure the type is right:

return (List<T>)(object)new List<Type1>(...
share|improve this answer

Whenever I'm going to see a if(typeof(T) == typeof(SomeType) i will switch to a dictionary which looks more or less this way:

public static class ListCreator
{
    private static readonly Dictionary<Type, Func<object>> _Creators;

    static ListCreator()
    {
        _Creators = new Dictionary<Type, Func<object>>();
        InitializeDefaultCreators();
    }

    public static List<T> Create<T>()
    {
        Func<object> creator;

        if (!_Creators.TryGetValue(typeof(T), out creator))
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("No creator available for type " + typeof(T).FullName);
        }

        return (List<T>)creator();
    }

    public static void Register<T>(Func<List<T>> creator)
    {
        _Creators.Add(typeof(T), creator);
    }

    public static void Register(Type type, Func<object> creator)
    {
        _Creators.Add(type, creator);
    }

    public static bool Unregister<T>()
    {
        return _Creators.Remove(typeof(T));
    }

    public static bool Unregister(Type type)
    {
        return _Creators.Remove(type);
    }

    private static void InitializeDefaultCreators()
    {
        Register(MyDoubleListCreator);
        Register(typeof(int), () => Enumerable.Range(1, 15).ToList());
    }

    private static List<double> MyDoubleListCreator()
    {
        return Enumerable.Range(1, 10).Select(Convert.ToDouble).Select(val => val + 0.3).ToList();
    }
}

This can than be used in these ways:

internal class Program
{
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        ListCreator.Register(SelfMadeList);

        var someIntegers = ListCreator.Create<int>();
        foreach (var item in someIntegers)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Some integer: " + item);
        }

        var someDoubles = ListCreator.Create<double>();
        foreach (var item in someDoubles)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Some doubles: " + item);
        }

        var someTimeSpans = ListCreator.Create<TimeSpan>();
        foreach (var item in someTimeSpans)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Some timespans: " + item);
        }

        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    private static List<TimeSpan> SelfMadeList()
    {
        return Enumerable.Range(1, 20)
                         .Select(Convert.ToDouble)
                         .Select(val => val + 0.5)
                         .Select(TimeSpan.FromHours)
                         .ToList();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If the types are not derived from a common class, you can return a List<Object> and then cast the individual elements when you use them.

share|improve this answer
    
Downvoter, care to explain? –  Daniel May 30 '13 at 14:06

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