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I need to store some various types of variables into an stl container (std::map in this case). Although, when it occurs that this variable is a string, I cannot afford to use std::string because memory usage is critical.

Hence, I need to find a way to store all my strings as cstrings (const char*) into that map. So I tryed to code make some kind of class to hold the value:

template<class T>
class ValueHolder {
private:
    T value;
public:
    ValueHolder(const T &argValue) :
        value(argValue) {
    }
    const T& getValue() {
        return value;
    }
    ~ValueHolder() {}
};

template<>
class ValueHolder<const char*> {
private:
    char* value;

public:
    ValueHolder(const char* argValue) {
        value = strdup(argValue);
        std::cout << "constructing ValueHolder(const char*) " << value << std::endl;
    }
    ValueHolder(const ValueHolder<const char*> &argExtension) {
        value = strdup(argExtension.value);
    }
    const char* getValue() const {
        std::cout << "returning ValueHolder(const char*) " << value << std::endl;
        return value;
    }
    ~ValueHolder() {
        if(value != NULL)
            free(value);
    }
};

Then, I declared the std::map

std::map<ValueType::Type, boost::any> extensions_;

And here are the functions which allow to set and retrieve it (using boost::any):

template<class Type>
Type getExtension(const ValueType::Type &argValueType) const {
    std::map<ValueType::Type, boost::any>::const_iterator it = extensions_.find(argValueType);
    if(it != extensions_.end()) {
        switch(argValueType) {
        case ValueType::VAL_INT:
            if(boost::is_same<EnumFooType::Type, Type>::value) {
                return (boost::any_cast<ValueHolder<Type> >((*it).second)).getValue();
            } else {
                std::cout << "Wrong type for this value" << std::endl;
            }
            break;
        case ValueType::VAL_STR_1:
        case ValueType::VAL_STR_2:
            if(boost::is_same<const char *, typename boost::decay<Type>::type>::value) {
                return (boost::any_cast<ValueHolder<Type> >((*it).second)).getValue();
            } else {
                std::cout << "Wrong type value for this Holder" << std::endl;
            }
            break;
        default:
            std::cout << "Unhandled type of value, skipping..." << std::endl;
            break;
        }

    }
    throw ValueNotFoundException("Could not find a value for this subscriber extension");
}

template<class T>
void setExtension(const ValueType::Type &argExtensionType , T argExtensionValue) {
    boost::any any_value;
    switch(argExtensionType) {
    case ValueType::VAL_INT:
        if(boost::is_same<EnumFooType::Type, T>::value) {
            any_value = ValueHolder<T>(argExtensionValue);
            extensions_[argExtensionType] = any_value;
        } else {
            std::cout << "Wrong type value for Billing subscriber extension" << std::endl;
        }
        break;
    case ValueType::VAL_STR_1:
    case ValueType::VAL_STR_2:
        if(boost::is_same<const char *, typename boost::decay<T>::type>::value) {
            any_value = ValueHolder<T>(argExtensionValue);
            extensions_[argExtensionType] = any_value;
        } else {
            std::cout << "Wrong type for this value, it should be a cstring!" << std::endl;
        }
        break;
    default:
        std::cout << "Unhandled value type, skipping..." << std::endl;
        break;
    }
}

The problem is that the value returned when the specified type is a cstring (const char*) is not right, here is my test program output:

constructing ValueHolder(const char*) FR

Good enum value :)

returning ValueHolder(const char*) FR

!!!ERROR!!! Value is �� instead of FR

I'll provide an online test program later if needed, but both liveworkspace and coliru are down at the moment.

Any help is appreciated, thanks in advance!

EDIT: Here is a test program: http://codepad.org/zbLQDAiS

EDIT2: Here the program I used to measure the memory usage with const char* and std::string: http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/view?id=3b3c4d7ce1d8d1400e3f6e45f75040dc-9294698a18feab30c803b17d837ba467

I simply made it a daemon and took a look at the process memory usage using top.

EDIT3: Here is an interesting article which shows about the same result: http://jovislab.com/blog/?p=76

share|improve this question
1  
There is also ideone: ideone.com ... actually this previous thread has a whole bunch of them stackoverflow.com/questions/3916000/… –  Shafik Yaghmour May 30 '13 at 13:22
    
Yes, but it does not work with boost. Edit: codepad does in fact! I'm adding that test program any minute! Thanks! –  Syffys May 30 '13 at 13:24
3  
Why is std::string worse than char*? std::string should allocate the same amount of memory as you allocate with char* but wrap an object around it. The memory consumption should be either the same, or very similar. IT sounds to me like you're putting a lot of effort to fix a non-issue. –  utnapistim May 30 '13 at 13:33
2  
What do you mean you "cannot afford" std::string? What do you think it is doing that is so expensive? [edit: have read your comment to Syffys. OMG. What? You need to find a different storage mechanism as a map of strings coming to 25GB (wtf is a Go?) is not fit for purpose. The solution is not to make memory management a living hell, but to fix your inappropriate data model.] –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 30 '13 at 16:35
1  
OK so you want fixed-size character arrays, equal in size to mere two pointers. Not full-featured arbitrary-sized dynamically-allocated strings. That's what you have measured at any rate. You should have started with that. If this is the case, you do NOT want to store const char*. You don't want to muck with pointers at all. Make a struct mystring { char[16] value; } and be done with it. Store struct mystring (not a pointer) in your map. If you think you need features of something that is not char[16], measure the performance something that is not char[16] first. –  n.m. May 30 '13 at 19:40

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