Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to pass an array (size 2 for simplicity) of vectors as an argument to a method "writeToVector()". This method will assign string values to the vector.

I've written a standalone test program (below) that works. But it doesn't work when I integrate it into my real program.

Is there something wrong with my program below? Is it working only "by accident"?

I'm not sure if the signature of the "writeToVector()" method is correct.

typedef std::vector<std::string> ExtensionType;

void writeToVector(ExtensionType *extensions)
{
  extensions[0].push_back("A");
  extensions[1].push_back("B");
}

void main(void)
{
  ExtensionType extensions[2];
  getExtensions(extensions);
  for(// loop through array of vectors)
  {
    for(// loop through vector's elements)
    {
     // print vector contents
    }
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
What does getExtensions(m_extensions); do? Does it modify the array? You'll have to show us the "real program". – Djon May 30 '13 at 14:29
    
That was a typo. I've changed "m_extensions" to "extensions" – casio car May 30 '13 at 14:33
    
Still what does getExtensions do? As for the signature, you can always do void writeToVector(ExtensionType[] extensions); I guess, but I'm not sure it's strictly the same. – Djon May 30 '13 at 14:35
    
If we don't know what "it doesn't work" means, we can't answer. Does it crash? Does it not modify the vectors? – Nikos C. May 30 '13 at 14:35
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your function is dangerous in that it assumes that a pointer passed to it points to the beginning of an array of size 2 or more. If this isn't the case, it will fall over in a heap. So better pass something that is guaranteed to have size 2, such as an std::array<EtnensionType, 2>.

void writeToVector(std::array<ExtensionType, 2>& extensions)
{
  extensions[0].push_back("A");
  extensions[1].push_back("B");
}

then

int main()
{
  std::array<ExtensionType, 2> extensions;
  getExtensions(extensions);
}

If you really are stuck with the array, then make sure it is size 2 only:

void writeToVector(ExtensionType (&extensions)[2])
{
  extensions[0].push_back("A");
  extensions[1].push_back("B");
}

int main()
{
  ExtensionType extensions[2];
  getExtensions(extensions);
}
share|improve this answer
    
He needs an array of Vectors. – Djon May 30 '13 at 14:28
    
Yes, the unchangeable constraint is array of vectors. – casio car May 30 '13 at 14:31
    
Juanchopanza, for now, let's ignore the dangers and assumptions. – casio car May 30 '13 at 14:32
    
Djon, The real program does not have any significant changes. – casio car May 30 '13 at 14:34
    
@casiocar I added an example using a size 2 array. – juanchopanza May 30 '13 at 14:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.