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I have an SQL Server 2012 Express database with the following situation. I have a Sales, a Purchase, and a Movement table. Both Sales and Purchase are summarized in the Movement table.

But I would like to control where the data comes from. Basically:

MOVEMENT_ID     TABLE_ID     RECORD_ID     PROD     QTY
1               PURCHASE     1             PENCIL   10
2               PURCHASE     2             ERASER   5
3               SALES        1             PENCIL   1
4               PURCHASE     3             MARKER   10

Don't worry about the normalization part, I just want to figure out if I can have a foreign key on the Record_ID column that links to the record of the table specified in the Table_ID column. So...

  • on MovementID=1, I want the first record of Purchase table
  • on MovementID=3, I want the first record of Sales table

Is this at all possible? If yes, how?

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5  
"Don't worry about the normalization part" is like saying don't worry about that flat tire on your car, it'll drive fine. –  Kermit May 30 '13 at 15:01
2  
I think you'd be better off with three columns Purchase_Id, Sales_Id, Source_Table –  T I May 30 '13 at 15:03
3  
If you normalize, this problem will go away - one way or another. Search for "supertype/subtype", there are 3 ways to resolve this kind of problem. –  ypercube May 30 '13 at 15:05
2  
@CogentP Foundation is important for a good concept. –  Kermit May 30 '13 at 15:05
8  
If you insist on using such an approach, you cannot establish real referential integrity. You cannot use ID+Type to somehow reference the Sales table once, and the Purchase table another time. Just cannot be done. Don'it do it - this is a horrible design idea..... use separate ID columns in Movements for sales and purchase - one of them is not null for every row (and the other will be null) –  marc_s May 30 '13 at 15:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It sounds like Movement is really a generalization of Purchase or Sale. If so, consider using .

This will obviate the problem of mixing different types of FKs in one column. The PK in the Movement table will reference the PK in either the Purchase or the Sale table, as the case may be. Fewer columns and also less confusion.

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thanks walter, thats what i was looking for! I can do the research from here!! –  CogentP Jun 2 '13 at 15:03

Is this at all possible?

Not directly, and I would warmly recommend separate fields with separate FKs (as others have already suggested).

However, since you are using MS SQL Server, you could do it indirectly like this:

  1. Create a persisted1 computed column SALE_ID that is:
    • equal to RECORD_ID when TABLE_ID = 'SALES'
    • and NULL otherwise.
  2. Create a persisted computed column PURCHASE_ID that is:
    • equal to RECORD_ID when TABLE_ID = 'PURCHASE'
    • and NULL otherwise.
  3. Create a FK from SALE_ID to Sales table and a separate FK from PURCHASE_ID to Purchase table.

For example:

ALTER TABLE Movement
    ADD SALE_ID AS IIF(TABLE_ID = 'SALES', RECORD_ID, NULL) PERSISTED
    REFERENCES Sales (SALE_ID);

ALTER TABLE Movement
    ADD PURCHASE_ID AS IIF(TABLE_ID = 'PURCHASE', RECORD_ID, NULL) PERSISTED
    REFERENCES Purchase (PURCHASE_ID);

[SQL Fiddle]


1 SQL Server forbids creating FOREIGN KEY on non-persisted computed columns.

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thanks Branko, i gave you a +One for helping out. I'm going to try walter's as its close to my original idea. if it becomes obviously hard to maintain then i'll go with a separate column for each fk. –  CogentP Jun 2 '13 at 15:04

Depending on what exactly you are doing this for, then a denormalized table like this might not be too bad (i.e. if it's just for querying/analyzing). However it could become hard to maintain (eg. what happens when the IDs from these tables have different data types etc). some examples of queries you might do though

;WITH SalesMovement AS
(
    SELECT * FROM Movement
    WHERE TableName = 'Sales'
)
SELECT PROD, SUM(QTY) FROM SalesMovement
GROUP BY PROD

 

;WITH PurchaseMovement AS
(
    SELECT * FROM Movement
    WHERE TableName = 'Purchase'
)
SELECT * FROM Purchase p
INNER JOIN PurchaseMovement pm ON pm.Record_Id = p.Id

 

;WITH PurchaseMovement AS
(
    SELECT * FROM Movement
    WHERE TableName = 'Purchase'
)
, SalesMovement AS
(
    SELECT * FROM Movement
    WHERE TableName = 'Sales'
)
SELECT * FROM Purchase p, 
INNER JOIN Sales s ON s.SaleDate = p.PurchaseDate
INNER JOIN PurchaseMovement pm ON pm.Record_Id = p.Id
INNER JOIN SalesMovement sm ON sm.Record_Id = s.Id

Whenever you wanted to join back to original data you would have to filter, cast and what have you which may become a real pita further down the line

Another thing to consider is whether something like the SUM(Qty) = SUM(ProductsSold) + SUM(ProductsSales) makes any sense, you'd have to be careful of this sort of 'misuse' of the data in the table.

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