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I am learning pattern matching in Haskell and I found some exercises which are said to be good for pattern matching.

Is there anyone who can give a little information about how to write a function that will return the number of addition operations in an expression?

I looked a little bit but couldn't find any information about it. Actually how can I return the number of operations in Haskell?

Another exercise which I don't understand is writing a function that will return the number of constants in an expression. I didn't understand what they meant with number of constants. Used variables in the expression maybe?

EDIT:

I forgot to add the definition of expressions. What I found related to this is:

Example (expression tree)

data Expression = Constant Integer
        | Negate Expression
        | Add Expression Expression
        | Multiply Expression Expression
   deriving Show

Example (evaluate an expression)

eval e = case e of
    Constant c -> c
    Negate e    -> -(eval e)
    Add e1 e2     -> (eval e1) + (eval e2)
    Multiply e1 e2 -> (eval e1) * (eval e2)

Thank you.

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2  
In what form are the expressions? Could you link to the exercises? – AndrewC May 30 '13 at 17:47
    
Sorry forgot to add. Edited but still couldn't understand. – Akeara May 30 '13 at 17:55
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Counting additions

Let's look at when there's an addition:

data Expression = Constant Integer
                | Negate Expression
                | Add Expression Expression  -- here!
                | Multiply Expression Expression

OK, let's make a patternmatching function for that

countAdds :: Expression -> Int

None in a constant:

countAdds (Constant i) = 0

If you negated something, there might have been adds in that - let's just count them and return that as the answer:

countAdds (Negate expr) = countAdds expr -- cool recursion trick

If there's an Add here, that's one, but there might be more adds in the two expressions you're adding:

countAdds (Add expr1 expr2) = 1 + countAdds expr1 + countAdds expr2

but in a Multiply, you just have however many are in the two expressions you're multiplying:

countAdds (Multiply expr1 expr2) = countAdds expr1 + countAdds expr2

All together that gives:

countAdds :: Expression -> Int
countAdds (Constant i) = 0
countAdds (Negate expr) = countAdds expr -- cool recursion trick
countAdds (Add expr1 expr2) = 1 + countAdds expr1 + countAdds expr2
countAdds (Multiply expr1 expr2) = countAdds expr1 + countAdds expr2

Counting other things

You can solve the other problems a similar way to the way I counted additions.

For the total number of operations, you'll need to have 1 + for the Multiply pattern, and possibly for the Negate one as well. (I don't know whether you just wanted to count binary operations like addition and multiplication or also unary operations like negation.)

Counting the constants works in a very similar way, except that you'd use 1 where I used 0. Would you need any 1 +?

Have a go and see how you get on.

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1  
I think i got the point thank you :) – Akeara May 30 '13 at 18:25

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