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I just started reading Accelerated C++ and I'm trying to work through the exercises when I came across this one:

0-4. Write a program that, when run, writes the Hello, world! program as its output.

And so I came up with this code:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cout << helloWorld << endl;

    cin.get();
    return 0;
}

void helloWorld(void)
{
    cout << "Hello, world!" << endl;
}

I keep getting the error 'helloWorld' : undeclared identifier. What I figured I was supposed to do is make a function for helloWorld then call that function for the output, but apparently that's not what I needed. I also tried putting helloWorld() in main, but that didn't help either. Any help is greatly appreciated.

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2  
helloWorld() needs to be declared before it can be used. –  Captain Obvlious May 30 '13 at 17:52
1  
I'm unclear on what the assignment asks. They want you to write a program that prints "Hello, World!" or a program that prints the code for a "Hello, World!" style program? The two are subtly different. –  Nik Bougalis May 30 '13 at 17:56
4  
@NikBougalis: Going from the quoted text it should clearly be the later. –  Grizzly May 30 '13 at 17:58
2  
code-ception!!! –  Green Demon May 30 '13 at 18:02
    
Did you meanwhile rethink your accept decision? You should have a look on Code-Apprentice's answer –  Wolf Aug 20 at 10:16

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're not actually calling your helloWorld function anywhere. How about:

int main()
{
    helloWorld(); // Call function

    cin.get();
    return 0;
}

Note: You'll also need to declare your function prototype at the top if you want to use it before it's defined.

void helloWorld(void);

Here's a working sample.

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3  
And you need to declare helloWorld() first. –  siritinga May 30 '13 at 17:53
    
@siritinga - Ah good call, I added a working Fiddle, err Ideone link.. –  Mike Christensen May 30 '13 at 17:59
    
Oh I see.. I just figured if that since the problem wanted me to make a program write "Hello, world!" as its output that I needed to put it between cout. Well, at least I know how to call functions now. :) Thank you very much. –  iKyriaki May 30 '13 at 18:02
    
@iKyriaki - Yup, I guess now you're supposed to write a program that outputs the above program... or something. –  Mike Christensen May 30 '13 at 18:04

The way I read the textbook exercise is that it wants you to write a program which prints out another C++ program to the screen. For now, you need to do this with a lot of cout statements and literal strings surrounded by ""s. For example, you can start with

cout << "#include <iostream>" << std::endl;
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Surprising to read iKyriaki's comment on the "accepted" answer ;) –  Wolf Aug 20 at 10:23

To call a function, you need to:

  • Provide a declaration prior to its use
  • Follow its name with a pair of parantheses, even if it doesn't have any arguments.
  • Provide a return value in order to use it in an expression.

For example:

std::string helloWorld();

int main()
{
   cout << helloWorld() << endl;
   ...
}

std::string helloWorld()
{
    return "Hello, world!";
}
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3  
Uhm... considering that helloWorld is a void function, this won't work even with the parentheses. –  Nik Bougalis May 30 '13 at 17:52
    
You're right - I missed the third mistake. Fixed above. –  Andy Thomas May 30 '13 at 18:00
hellwoWorld();

instead of cout << helloWorld << endl;

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In your main function, helloWorld is not a declared variable.

You want hellowWorld to be a string whose contents are the hello world program.

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depending on the compiler you are using, you might need to put helloWorld function before your main like this.

void helloWorld(void)
{
    .....
}
int main()
{
    .....
}

I use visual studios and I am forced to do this ....

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You dont really need the helloworld function defined at the bottom. Something like this should do it.

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    //cout will output to the screen whatever is to the right of the insertion operator, 
    //thats the << to it's right. 
    //After "hello world" the insertion operator appears again to insert a new line (endl)
    cout << "hello world" << endl;

    //cin.get()  waits for the user to press a key before 
    //allowing the program to end
    cin.get();
    return 0;
}
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