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I'm trying to achieve the same result that this question asks:

I want to show list items as 2 or more columns (dynamic alignment)

Except that, instead of requiring script or css hacks, I'd like to reorder the data to begin with so that I can use "float: left;"

So instead of the list coming back like 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10

for two columns it would come back 1,6,2,7,3,8,4,9,5,10

Possible?

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1  
Maybe something like OrderBy(row => row.ColumnOne).ThenBy(row => row.ColumnTwo) –  Steven Wexler May 30 '13 at 18:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's one way, using Linq:

var m = (int)Math.Ceiling(input.Count() / 2d); // two columns
var sorted = input.Select((x, i) => new { x, i })
                  .OrderBy(p => p.i % m)
                  .Select(p => p.x);

This can be fairly easily generalized to any number of columns. If you want, it can easily be turned into an extension method:

public static IEnumerable<T> Columns<T>(this IEnumerable<T> input, int cols)
{
    if (cols < 1)
    {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(...);
    }

    var m = (int)Math.Ceiling(input.Count() / (double)cols);
    return input.Select((x, i) => new { x, i })
                .OrderBy(p => p.i % m)
                .Select(p => p.x);
}

// Usage
var input = new[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 };
var sorted = input.Columns(2); // { 1, 6, 2, 7, 3, 8, 4, 9, 5, 10 }
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What magic is this? LOL. Nice, let me give it a try. –  rball May 30 '13 at 18:46
    
+1 nice solution. –  I4V May 30 '13 at 18:48
    
good solution..+1 –  ridoy May 30 '13 at 18:57
    
@p.s.w.g Was just about to say that it seemed that 3 and 5 weren't working. –  rball May 30 '13 at 19:13
    
That fixed it. Nice stuff. –  rball May 30 '13 at 19:17

This will cover two columns easily enough.

public static IEnumerable<T> UseTwoColumns<T>(List<T> list)
{
    int halfway = list.Count / 2;
    for (int i = 0; i < halfway; i++)
    {
        yield return list[i];
        yield return list[halfway + i];
    }
    if (list.Count % 2 != 0)
        yield return list[list.Count - 1];
}

If you wanted to generalize it to passing the number of columns as a parameter it'd be a tad more complex:

public static IEnumerable<T> UseColumns<T>(List<T> list, int columns)
{
    int columnHeight = list.Count / columns;
    for (int i = 0; i < columnHeight + 1; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < columns; j++)
        {
            int index = i + columnHeight * j;
            if (index < list.Count)
                yield return list[index];
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, that would be helpful. Right now I will sometimes have 4 and other times 5 columns. Good start though :) –  rball May 30 '13 at 18:37
    
This was the same route I started going down, although you got there a lot quicker than I did (and I had a while loop:) p.s.w.g's just made me learn more is all. –  rball May 30 '13 at 19:18

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