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Let's say I have 2 tables, EMPLOYEE and EMP_BAK. I need to create a backup table for all the data that deleted from employee, even these that are rolled back

My trigger:

CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER emp_del_bak_trg
before delete ON employee 
FOR EACH row 
DECLARE 
oldname department.department_name%type;
newname department.department_name%type;
BEGIN
INSERT INTO emp_bak 
VALUES (:OLD.employee_id, :OLD.employee_name, :OLD.job
       ,:OLD.hire_date,:OLD.department_id, sysdate);
--commit;
end;

Now, if I rollback then the data will be deleted; if I uncomment out commit, I'll get an error on deleting. The idea is to keep the record plus keep track of the system updates.

Any ideas how to get around this?

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is almost never a good reason to commit inside a trigger.

Now, that's out of the way your situation seems to be extra special, you need to track it, even if the transaction is rolled back. This is a fairly unusual requirement, but I'm going to assume you have a very good reason for doing this.

If you really, really, want to do this you need to use an autonomous transaction, this enables an independent transaction to be committed within another. As a trigger is a PL/SQL block, you can do this in a trigger.

The Oracle documentation has a separate section dealing with autonomous transactions in triggers, with plenty of examples for you. Wherever you need to use one the syntax is as follows, this is always placed in the DECLARE block:

PRAGMA AUTONOMOUS_TRANSACTION;

Your trigger, therefore, would look as follows:

create or replace trigger emp_del_bak_trg
   before delete on employee 
   for each row 
declare 
   PRAGMA AUTONOMOUS_TRANSACTION;
begin

   insert into emp_bak 
   values ( :old.employee_id, :old.employee_name, :old.job
          , :old.hire_date, :old.department_id, sysdate);
   commit;

end;
/

As a little note I always case this differently so it's obvious you're doing something that you shouldn't be. Autonomous transactions are dangerous and should be used with extreme care.

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Thanks Ben, this is what i was looking for, –  DuckStalker May 30 '13 at 21:00
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