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I need to iterate over n pairs of integers: (0, 1), (1, 2), (2, 3) ... (n-2, n-1), (n-1, 0)

What's the best way to do it?

  1. Using modulo operation:

    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++){
        int a = i;
        int b = (i + 1)%n
        //MaaaanyLinesOfDoSomethingWithAAndB
    }
    
  2. Using ternary operation:

    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++){
        int a = i;
        int b = (i + 1 == n ? 0 : i + 1)
        //MaaaanyLinesOfDoSomethingWithAAndB
    }
    
  3. Or:

    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++){
        int a = i;
        int b = (i + 1 >= n ? 0 : i + 1)
        //MaaaanyLinesOfDoSomethingWithAAndB
    }
    
  4. Another idea? Let's assume that there are maaaany lines of do something and it'd look ugly if we do (0, 1), (1, 2), (2, 3) ... (n-2, n-1) part and (n-1, 0) part separately.

Which operation is the most efficient one?

EDIT #1 I'm sorry, I think I haven't asked my question properly. I wanted to know which operator acts faster (in, e.g. seconds or clock ticks). I also decided to make little experiment and just measure it by clock() function. Here's my code:

#include <time.h>
#include <limits.h>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

typedef void (*fun) (int a);

void DoSomething(int i){
    int a = i;
}

void ModuloOperation (int n){
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        DoSomething((i + 1) % n);
}

void TernaryEqual (int n){
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        DoSomething(i + 1 == n ? 0 : i + 1);
}

void TernaryBiggerEqual (int n){
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        DoSomething(i + 1 >= n ? 0 : i + 1);
}

void SplitIntoTwoParts (int n){
    for (int i = 0; i < n - 1; i++)
        DoSomething(i + 1);
    DoSomething(n - 1);
}

int main(){

    const int n = INT_MAX;

    string testNames[] = {
        "Modulo", 
        "Trenary equal", 
        "Trenary bigger equal", 
        "Split into two parts"
    };

    fun tests[] = {
        ModuloOperation, 
        TernaryEqual, 
        TernaryBiggerEqual, 
        SplitIntoTwoParts
    };

    clock_t t;

    for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(testNames)/sizeof(testNames[0]); i++){

        t = clock();
        tests[i](n);
        t = clock() - t;

        cout<<testNames[i]<<": "<<((float)t)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC<<" seconds\n\n";
    }

    return 0;
}

And here's an output

Modulo: 53.867 seconds

Trenary equal: 36.684 seconds

Trenary bigger equal: 37.299 seconds

Split into two parts: 31.37 seconds

So it seems that p.s.w.g's idea is not only the cleanest one but also the best one.

And once again, sorry for my mistake, I'm not native speaker, I'm still learning.

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4  
The efficiency depends on the "MaaaanyLinesOfDoSomethingWithAAndB", not on how you select b. –  Michael Myers May 30 '13 at 20:02
    
what is b suppose to be equal to? –  gunr2171 May 30 '13 at 20:04
    
When determining efficiency, and especially time complexity, we often take the most expensive operation to be our metric. As @MichaelMyers said, it's most likely that the metric is hidden in //MaanyLinesOfDoSomethingWithAAndB. –  christopher May 30 '13 at 20:04
4  
You've written the code all three ways already. If you want to know which one is more efficient run them all, measure the resource consumption of each, and then you'll know. That's the only way to find out, so just do it. –  Eric Lippert May 30 '13 at 21:14
1  
@r4czek: Your English is fine. "Efficiency" is work divided by cost; how you choose what "work" and "cost" are is up to you. In your case you're measuring the action of your method as "work" and the total time as "cost". If you halve the amount of time and get the same amount of work done in that time then you are being twice as efficient. You might care about some cost other than time, like network bandwidth, or dollars, or disk space, in which case you would be measuring those things instead of time. –  Eric Lippert May 30 '13 at 21:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You mentioned that it would look ugly if you do the 'maaaany' lines separately. None of the above options are particularly pretty either. So perhaps it's better to encapsulate this ugly logic in a method and use some more elegant code in your loop.

For readability, I'd probably go with this:

for (int i = 0; i < n - 1; i++){
    DoStuff(i, i + 1);
}
DoStuff(n - 1, 0);

// elsewhere
void DoStuff(int a, int b)
{
    //MaaaanyLinesOfDoSomethingWithAAndB
}

If the 'maaaany' lines require the use of a number local variables and you don't want to pass them all in to the DoStuff method, you might want to consider using a closure, although it wouldn't help the readability of your code nearly as much as proper functional decomposition. Something like this:

Action<int, int> doStuff = (a, b) =>
{
    //MaaaanyLinesOfDoSomethingWithAAndB
};

for (int i = 0; i < n - 1; i++){
    doStuff(i, i + 1);
}
doStuff(n - 1, 0);

Or perhaps you need to refactor the 'maaaany' lines into a separate worker class, but without knowing more about what's in those lines, it's hard to say.

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