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What is the best way to separate the individual characters in an array of strings strArr into an array of those characters charArr, as depicted below?

string[] strArr = { "123", "456", "789" };
char[] chrArr = { '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9' };

This is what I am currently doing, but I do not think that it is very elegant:

int characterCount = 0;

for (int i = 0; i < strArr.Length; i++)
{
    characterCount += strArr[i].Length;
}

int indexCount = 0;
char[] chrArr = new char[characterCount];

for (int i = 0; i < strArr.Length; i++)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < strArr[i].Length; j++)
    {
        chrArr[indexCount] = strArr[i][j];
        indexCount++;
    }
}
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6 Answers

up vote 42 down vote accepted

Well, easiest way would be this:

char[] chrArr = string.Join(string.Empty, strArr).ToCharArray();

To make sure there is no confusion over performance characteristics here, here is a short program to test in LINQPad (don't forget to turn on optimizations in the lower right corner):

static string[] strArr = { "123", "456", "789" };

void Main()
{
    const int iterations = 10000000; // 10 million

    // Warm up JITter
    StringJoin();
    LINQSelectMany();
    LINQ();

    Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    for (int index = 0; index < iterations; index++)
        StringJoin();
    sw.Stop();
    sw.ElapsedMilliseconds.Dump("String.Join");

    sw.Restart();
    for (int index = 0; index < iterations; index++)
        LINQSelectMany();
    sw.Stop();
    sw.ElapsedMilliseconds.Dump("LINQ SelectMany");

    sw.Restart();
    for (int index = 0; index < iterations; index++)
        LINQ();
    sw.Stop();
    sw.ElapsedMilliseconds.Dump("LINQ");
}

public static void StringJoin()
{
    char[] c = string.Join(string.Empty, strArr).ToCharArray();
}

public static void LINQSelectMany()
{
    char[] c = strArr.SelectMany(s => s).ToArray();
}

public static void LINQ()
{
    var characters = (from s in strArr
                      from c in s
                      select c).ToArray();

}

You can download this LINQPad script here if you want to play with it.

Output (in milliseconds):

String.Join 
765 

LINQ SelectMany 
5098 

LINQ 
5465 

(the usual caveat about performance measuring code applies here, point out any mistakes I made)

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2  
This seems really silly. LINQ seems much more intuitive and appropriate... –  Timothy Shields May 30 '13 at 20:42
10  
Please define "appropriate". A simple performance test shows that my line outranks the SelectMany line by a factor of 8. Since neither seems to offer any specific benefits over the other (like handling edgecases or whatnot better), I'd take the faster one if I can. Personally I don't feel like they are that much different in terms of readability either. –  Lasse V. Karlsen May 30 '13 at 20:47
    
appropriate (adj.): Suitable or proper in the circumstances. :) - I wasn't saying you were wrong, I was simply saying it "seemed" more intuitive (or C# idiomatic) to use LINQ. Feel free to disagree though. –  Timothy Shields May 30 '13 at 20:59
2  
Yeah, strings and their string methods are very highly optimised indeed! –  Matthew Watson May 30 '13 at 21:02
    
+1 for performance measurements and reasonable comments in discussion section –  Ilya Ivanov May 30 '13 at 21:09
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I would do:

char[] chrArr = strArr.SelectMany(s => s).ToArray();
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4  
I can't belive this answer gets 2 upvotes and the silly one 14. –  I4V May 30 '13 at 20:12
2  
@I4V How is it silly? I find it extremely clever. –  It'sNotALie. May 30 '13 at 20:13
2  
@newStackExchangeInstance Continue to do... –  I4V May 30 '13 at 20:13
1  
@I4V What? What do you mean? –  It'sNotALie. May 30 '13 at 20:17
2  
I do think this answer is the best approach in terms of minimising time and space resources. And it's actually shorter. ;) –  Matthew Watson May 30 '13 at 20:41
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var res = strArr.SelectMany(c => c.ToCharArray()).ToArray();
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2  
This is my favorite. –  Ed Plunkett May 30 '13 at 20:08
    
@EdPlunkett Can I ask why while ToCharArray is unnecessary? –  I4V May 30 '13 at 20:40
    
@I4V Good point. You're right, and I missed that. I liked it because of SelectMany(), and preferred it to the other SelectMany() because of "var" instead of char[]. –  Ed Plunkett May 30 '13 at 20:44
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LINQ based version would be:

var input = new string[] { "abc", "def", "ghi" };
var characters = (from s in input
                  from c in s
                  select c).ToArray();

foreach (var c in characters) Console.WriteLine(c);
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This is basically an extension of Jesse Slicer's answer.

Simply cleaning up your code with ReSharper (if you don't have this or something like it, go get it now) yields this:

var characterCount = strArr.Sum(t => t.Length);

var indexCount = 0;
var chrArr = new char[characterCount];

foreach (var t1 in strArr.SelectMany(t => t))
{
    chrArr[indexCount] = t1;
    indexCount++;
}

The foreach is just filling an array and there's already a LINQ method ToArray for that. Then characterCount and indexCount are completely unnecessary.

var chrArr = strArr.SelectMany(t => t).ToArray();
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try this..

 string value="";
 string[] strArr = { "123", "456", "789" }; //Your string array.

 for(int i=0;i<strArr.Length;i++)
 {
     value+=strArr[i];
 }
  char [] array=value.ToCharArray();
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