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In my code, I have a collection of objects that are instances of classes that don't work with the new code. They all need to be translated to their corresponding classes that are defined locally. I am trying to make a clean way of determining the type of class that the instance is and calling the appropriate translate method based on that type. However, I can't seem to find a way to do this as cleanly as I'd like. Here is my code.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

namespace TranslatorSwitchExample
{
    public class Class1
    {
        void DoWork()
        {
            var oldTypes = new Base1[]
                {
                    new ClassA{ IntProperty = 1 },
                    new ClassB{ StringProperty = "test" }, 
                };
            var newTypes = TranslateAll(oldTypes);
        }

        static IEnumerable<Base2> TranslateAll(IEnumerable<Base1> oldTypes)
        {
            var newTypes = oldTypes.Select(x => TranslateByType[x.GetType()](x));
            return newTypes;
        }

        static readonly Dictionary<Type, Func<Base1, Base2>> TranslateByType =
            new Dictionary<Type, Func<Base1, Base2>>
                {
                    { typeof(ClassA), TranslateClassAToClassC },
                    { typeof(ClassB), TranslateClassBToClassD }
                };

        static Base2 TranslateClassAToClassC(Base1 old)
        {
            var oldClassA = old as ClassA;
            return new ClassC
                {
                    IntProperty = oldClassA.IntProperty
                };
        }

        static Base2 TranslateClassBToClassD(Base1 old)
        {
            var oldClassB = old as ClassB;
            return new ClassD
                {
                    StringProperty = oldClassB.StringProperty
                };
        }
    }

    abstract class Base1 { }

    class ClassA : Base1
    {
        public int IntProperty;
    }

    class ClassB : Base1
    {
        public string StringProperty;
    }

    abstract class Base2 { }

    class ClassC : Base2
    {
        public int IntProperty;
    }

    class ClassD : Base2
    {
        public string StringProperty;
    }
}

This does everything that I want it to, but Resharper complains about the possible NullReferenceException in my translate methods (after the "as" keyword). I know that a null reference isn't possible because I'm only calling the translate methods with types that I know will cast properly. I could throw in a null reference check after the cast, but it's needless defensive programming, and I'm trying to keep this as clean as possible. I also know that I could just ignore the warning and keep going, but I also recognize that Resharper is telling me that this is a code smell, and I'd like to know the proper way to do it.

In an ideal world, I might do this through polymorphism and have Base1 implement an interface called ITranslatableToBase2 or something like that. But in my actual code, Base1 comes from a POCO library and isn't aware of Base2, so the translator would have to be its own polymorphic object. I tried implementing it and it turns out that while using a factory pattern is slightly cleaner than this dictionary pattern I have here, the casting problem still exists.

So, I'm throwing it out here as a thought experiment. I've exhausted almost everything I can think of, but maybe there's something I haven't thought of yet. What is the absolute best way to achieve what I'm trying to do while keeping the code as clean as possible?

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1 Answer 1

Maybe you could use the adapter pattern; You could have an interface for IClassC and ClassC would implement this, then:

public class ClassBToCAdapter : IClassC
{
     private ClassB adaptee;
     public ClassBToCAdapter(ClassB classB)
     {
        this.adaptee = classB
     }

     public int IntProperty
     {
        get { return adaptee.IntProperty; }
        set { adaptee.IntProperty = value; }
     }
}
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1  
This seems really cool. It makes me realize that there might be an even simpler answer which is to just put a constructor in ClassC which takes in a type of ClassA and does all the translation work there. –  user779860 May 30 '13 at 20:51

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