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the following SQL is returning every BT.Bt_Name where L.date_back is Null. I only wish to select the BT.Bt_Names where L.Bc_id is duplicated

SELECT BT.Bt_Name
FROM Book_Title BT INNER JOIN (
    Book_Copy BC INNER JOIN Loan L ON BC.Bc_id = L.Bc_id
)   ON BT.Bt_id = BC.Bt_id
WHERE L.Date_back Is NULL
GROUP BY BT.Bt_name
HAVING COUNT(L.Bc_id) >1;

Is it the joins which are causing COUNT(L.Bc_id) to be >1 for all records where L.Date_back Is NULL? FYI only one should be returned (deliberate input error).

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2 Answers 2

Why bother with the brackets? Why not this?

SELECT BT.Bt_Name, count(*) ct FROM Book_Title BT

INNER JOIN  Book_Copy BC on BT.Bt_id = BC.Bt_id

INNER JOIN Loan L ON BC.Bc_id = L.Bc_id

WHERE L.Date_back Is NULL

GROUP BY BT.Bt_name HAVING COUNT(*) >1;

Or do I have the wrong end of the stick?

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Yes, you are inadvertently creating a Cartesian product between Book_Title and Loan.

Try this:

HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT BC.Bt_id) > 1
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hi, MS Access 2007 returns SYNTAX ERROR (MISSING OPERATOR) with that change. Have tried UNIQUE also and same error message. Guess this could be my issue, sadly I must use these products. –  AlasdairC Nov 6 '09 at 0:32
    
In the future it would help if you mention in your question what technology you're using. –  Bill Karwin Nov 6 '09 at 0:40
    
Apologies for that, will do in future.. –  AlasdairC Nov 6 '09 at 0:43
    
For the Access Database Engine, you have to do the DISTINCT part in a subquery :( –  onedaywhen Nov 6 '09 at 1:53

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